Gil Brewer Revisited

The Red Scarf-A Killer is Loose

The latest Mystery Scene magazine e-newsletter included Ben Boulden’s “2018 Reissues Roundup: Some Of The Best Books To Hit The Page (Again)”, starting with Stark House Noir Classics, nice looking trade paperbacks ranging from $17.95 – $21.95 US, most with reproductions of vintage postwar illustrations for their cover art (not necessarily the cover art from the novels’ original editions, though) and usually double books (two novels). Boulden’s article features Stark House’s republished version of two Gil Brewer novels, The Red Scarf and A Killer Is Loose from 1958.

A lot of Gil Brewer material deals with regular folks who are particularly unlucky, whether with money, jobs, love, marriage, you name it, and such is the case in The Red Scarf.

The Red Scarf Montage

Roy and Bess Nichols’ roadside motel looks out on a planned highway that never was built, so now they’re deep in debt, unable to borrow any more from the bank or family, and Roy’s taken to drinking too much. Doing just that at Al’s Bar-B-Q one night, Roy hitches a ride home with Noel and Vivian Teece, a bag man and his girl who’ve had a few themselves. When an accident kills Noel (or so it seems) Vivian grabs their satchel of mob money and holes up in Cabin No. 6 at Roy’s hotel, where Roy obsesses over the bag of dirty loot tied shut with her red scarf, even as the law and some very dangerous gangsters start to sniff around.

The Red Scarf

I’d read some Gil Brewer before, including Hard Case Crime’s edition of The Vengeful Virgin and Wild To Possess/A Taste Of Sin, another Stark House double. Brewer (1922 – 1983) was a Florida writer who usually set his fairly bleak tales in familiar turf, all of them a kind of ‘sun-drenched’ noir that neglects the glitz of Miami Beach for back roads, small towns, roadhouses and hot sheet hotels instead. My own work has me constantly stuck in a 1959 mindset, so some more late 50’s/early 60’s era Gil Brewer ought to go down swell right now.

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