Closing In On A Hundred Years.

Writers Digest Masthead

Writer’s Digest magazine put out a call from their website at writersdigest.com for readers, subscribers and contributors to share their memories of how the magazine has impacted their writing, all in anticipation of celebrating the publication’s 100th anniversary starting in January 2020.

If you spotted my post from a week ago, Publisher’s Weekly and various business publications reported that Writer’s Digest’s parent company F+W Media is in Chapter 11 bankruptcy since earlier this month, which makes that 100th anniversary landmark suddenly sound a little ‘iffy’. But I choose not to overreact. Chapter 11 can enable reorganization, often in conjunction with the sale of selected assets, liquidation of money-losing operations, negotiations with creditors and a leaner but more stable organization as a result. Still, sometimes it’s just a prelude to something worse. Business works in mysterious ways.

Writing Mysteries 2nd Edition

When I wrote that previous post, I had the Writer’s Digest Books 2019 Guide To Literary Agents sitting beside my keyboard. Right now I have the second edition of Writer’s Digest Books’ Writing Mysteries, edited by Sue Grafton (RIP), an older but pretty pristine 2002 edition from a used bookstore, packed full of helpful guidance from a long list of the genre’s heavy hitters, and sitting in that very same spot in front of me.

F+W Media owns some crafting, outdoors and collectibles publications that could vanish without my noticing, though their subscribers might not agree. But it’s hard to imagine a world without Writer’s Digest magazine, or Writer’s Digest books for that matter. 100 years? That’s one heck of a legacy. So lets all keep our fingers crossed that the magazine, its subsidiary businesses and the parent company find a solution to their current problems.

 

One thought on “Closing In On A Hundred Years.

Add yours

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: