Beach Reads, Murder & Mayhem.

NYT Summer Thrillers

Last Sunday’s New York Times Book Review feature “Murder, Betrayal, Sweet Revenge: A Summer’s Worth Of Thrillers” could prod any mystery/crime fiction fan to head straight to the bookstore. Laura Lippman’s Lady In The Lake was treated to a full page review by none other than Stephen King, a fellow who’s knocked out a book or two himself. King’s review opens with an anecdote about Edmund Wilson’s 1945 essay in which the critic dismissed most detective and mystery fiction as little more than crossword puzzles, wondering why anyone would even care who-killed-who (insert a novel’s victim here). Well, as King rightly pointed out, clearly millions care, evidenced by the many, many millions of mystery/crime fiction books sold in the nearly 75 years since Wilson first rankled readers with his snooty observations. And, as King further explained, he cared specifically who killed Eunetta Scherwood and Tessie Fine, whose mid-1960’s Baltimore murders are investigated by Madeline “Maddie” Schwartz in Laura Lippman’s Lady In The Lake.

Lady In The Lake

Terri Gerritsen, Karin Slaughter, Lee Child and several other thriller writers responded to the Times’ question, “What’s the most memorable murder you’ve ever dreamed up?”, with some pretty grisly (and funny) answers. Author Lisa Gardner explained where a thriller writer goes to research her latest murder in “A Visit To The Body Farm”, forensic anthropologist Bill Bass’ University Of Tennessee three-acre wooded Anthropology Research Facility which contains nearly a thousand decomposing corpses, ready for educational use by budding crime lab students. (Ugghhh.) Ross MacDonald and Tina Joran put together a two page “Murder Map” (the illustration sans callouts shown here) with an exemplary true crime book highlighted for each of the fifty states. It’s like a mystery/crime fiction enthusiast’s centerfold pinup, suitable for hanging over your writing desk or reading chair.

NYT Book Review

And after reading multiple mystery/crime fiction reviews, there was Kate Tuttle’s piece, certainly the most thought provoking in last week’s edition. Tuttle notes that over 70 percent of Amazon’s  true crime book reviews are by women, and her essay “Why Are Women Such Devoted Readers Of True Crime?” recalls grisly summer camp serial killer storytelling: “When the lights go out, we talk about what scares us: The near miss, the victim that could have been us.” Kate Tuttle wonders, “Why did we thrill so to these stories? What possible benefit could we derive from hearing about someone like us who had met the worst possible fate – not dying from a freak accident or a sudden illness but dying the way girls are killed: Intimately, sexually, compulsively, fueled by jealousy or entitlement or rage?” The question wasn’t fully answered, perhaps, leaving us all to ponder it on our own.

NYT Summer Thrillers 2

 

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