Mystery Scene #161

mystery sceneAlways a treat to find the new Mystery Scene in my mailbox, even when the stack of books on my to-be-read end table is overflowing (and it really is). The issue offered up its always reliable mix of new, retro and unusual topics and didn’t disappoint…but, does it ever? Some highlights:

Bulldog drummond books

Michael Mallory’s Bulldog Drummond was a treat. News to me that there’d been around two dozen Bulldog Drummond films released between 1922 and 1969. I’ve only seen one, probably waking up on the couch in the wee hours with my hand on the remote tuned to some oddball channel. I can’t even remember for sure which one it was at that. Adventurer and investigator Bulldog Drummond was created by British Army officer Herman Cyril McNeile, who wrote under the pen name “Sapper” (British Army regulations prohibiting service members from using their real names for fiction publication) with ten Bulldog Drummond novels published between 1920 and 1937. Gerard Fairlie and then Henry Raymond continued the series from 1938 through 1969.

Ray Milland Bulldog Drummond 2

John B. Valeri’s piece on reporter turned writer Alex Segura and his Pete Fernandez private eye series was a real teaser, opening with a Segura quote, “I like to keep readers on their toes. I like to pull the rug out from under them…”, and then closing with something to keep fans alert. Segura may be following up his fifth Pete Fernandez private eye novel, Miami Midnight (2019) with something quite different and soon. “While he’s a bit cagey about the details, (Segura) does drop a few tantalizing clues as to what readers can expect: A non-PI female lead, a different time period and a murder. Beyond that, all bets are off.” Well, here’s betting I’ll be watching closely for something like this from Mr. Segura, and it can’t come to soon.

The most unusual piece was Craig Sisterson’s “Found In Translation” a five pager looking closely at mystery/crime fiction work translated to English and vice-versa, but more specifically, talking to the translators themselves. Though I’m currently hard at work – and more or less working from scratch — on launching a particular project (can you guess…”The Stiletto Gumshoe”), I’m not actually a newbie to the writing/publishing racket…more like reinventing myself. But under a prior pen name, my second novel sold the foreign rights. It was only one market, but hey, the check cashed just fine. I can’t write or speak a single word of that particular language, so I’ve always wondered how well they did with the slang and vernacular. Sisterson’s article drives home what an art quality translations really are.

 

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