Mark of The Vampire.

Inside Detective - Mark Of The Vampire April 1939 copy

Mark of The Vampire? No, it’s not a feature on MGM’s 1935 Todd Browning film with Bela Lugosi donning the black cape (only the second time onscreen, I think).

This “Mark of The Vampire” is from the 1939 issue of Inside Detective magazine with cover art by illustrator Albert Fisher, and is a lurid ‘all-true’ story about an Oakland, California ‘vampire killer’, his victim found in a lovers lane.

Mark 3

I’d been planning on something goofy for later Halloween evening, once the trick-or-treaters stop ringing the bell, that is. Instead of watching creepy classics (and I have a few on DVD), maybe just a horror comedy like Victoria Justice in The Boy Who Cried Werewolf (what, you don’t have any guilty pleasures?) or perhaps the first Elvira movie with…well, Elvira, of course.

mark 1

But I know I have MGM’s 1935 Mark of The Vampire lurking somewhere on my shelves. Bela Lugosi, ultra-creepy Carrol Borland as his vampire daughter Luna, the two Lionel’s – Barrymore and Atwill – as an investigator and police inspector in a mid-1930’s visual delight of gothic eeriness, despite Todd Browning’s insistence on inserting intrusive comedic bits that really…just…aren’t. Originally titled The Vampires of Prague, adapted from Browning’s silent era London After Midnight (the Holy Grail of lost silent era films) and based on a scenario by Guy Endore, the film deals with the death of a Bohemian nobleman, apparently a victim of Count Mora and his daughter Luna, the local vampires. But near the film’s end, it’s all revealed as an elaborate ruse to catch a very human murderer with his eye on the victim’s daughter. I’ve never decided if Todd Browning was a genius or a hack (most likely a little of both) but the man sure could set up some stunning visuals, and Mark of The Vampire, for all of its flaws, is classic horror eye candy.

Hmmm…I could go gloomy and gothic instead of ‘goofy’, couldn’t I?

mark 2

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: