Always Falling For The Bad Girls.

Crime Reads - Strong Women In Mystery

Caroline and Charles Todd, authors of the Ian Rutledge and Bess Crawford mystery series, chatted about memorably strong women literary characters in the January 7thCrime Reads. Whether hero or villain, and without any implicit ratings (like least to most), their informal list ranged from Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca and Rachel in My Cousin Rachel to Harper Lee’s Scout and Bronte’s Catherine Earnshaw, and closer to home in modern mysteries, Sara Paretsky’s V.I. Warshawski and Sue Grafton’s Kinsey Millhone. Their list isn’t intended as a comprehensive chart of powerful female literary characters, but more of a dialog prompt for readers. They list a few with their reasons, then close with, “…How would you change our list? Or add to it? And more importantly, why.”

Crime Reads Montage

Their prompt worked, and got me thinking. The first few who immediately came to mind were Phyllis Dietrichson in Double Indemnity, Bridget Gregory in The Last Seduction, Judith Rashleigh from L.S. Hilton’s Maestra novels and even Selina Kyle/Catwoman and Harley Quinn from the comics world. I stopped once I realized that I was coming up with nothing but villains, completely ignoring the long list of heroic cops, district attorneys, private eyes and plucky amateurs who comprise so much of my own reading (and writing: as in, the ‘Stiletto Gumshoe’ herself). Rebecca Cantrell’s Hannah Vogel? Stumptown’s Dex Parios? James Ziskin’s Eleanora Stone or Robert Eversz’ Nina Zero? Kara Danvers or Kate Kane? Nope. Troublemakers are the women who automatically popped into my head first, whether from novels, film, comics or TV.

There must be a message there, or something I should reckon with.

Caroline and Charles Todd wondered how readers might change or add to their list of memorably strong literary women, and why. Me? I’m still scratching my head and wondering why I thought of bad girlz before the heroes came to mind. And I’ll keep wondering, but you should go to Crimereads.com to read the Todd’s short article.

 

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