In The Study With A Typewriter.

In The Study With A Typewriter

The 8.3.20 issue of Publisher’s Weekly (which I didn’t get till ten days later, for some reason) includes an 8-page tribute commemorating the 100th anniversary of the publication of Agatha Christie’s debut, “The Mysterious Affair At Styles”, which introduced Hercule Poirot. The writer’s prodigious output (66 novels under her own name, 6 more under a pen name, 14 story collections, plays, etc.) make her the world’s best-selling and most translated author according to Guinesss World Records, with well over 7,000 translations of her work, more than a billion copies of her books sold in English, and another billion in other languages. Liz Scheier provides a 4-page article in PW, “In The Study With A Typewriter”, followed by her 4-page “And Then There Were More” where mystery writers discuss the debt owed to the Queen of Crime.

Visitors and followers here can safely guess that my own tastes might run a bit more hard-boiled than a lot of the cozier British (and U.S.) material written in the golden age of detective fiction. But I’d never have discovered the subsets of mystery/crime fiction that I love without Arthur Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie…heck, even Nancy Drew mysteries. “Mystery tropes that now seem inextricably baked into the category first became popular in Christie’s books,” Scheier writes. And unlike the noir-ish material I gravitate towards, there’s a lot of comfort to be found in cozies, soft mysteries and the wealth of material that traces back to Agatha Christie…particularly the sense of justice and closure her books offer. Maybe there’s not a ‘happy ending’ for everyone, but there are no loose ends and the bad guys are brought to justice. Scheier quotes author Hannah Dennison: “(Christie’s) dealing with evil in the world, but at the end, goodness always comes through. It gives you the sense that even though the world, especially now, is so full of injustice and darkness, things will always come right.”

It looks like the articles are accessible at PW’s site: www.publishersweekly.com.

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