More of Daniel’s ‘Dolls’

Daniel Cooney 1

A couple sketches from writer-artist Daniel Cooney, creator of The Tommy Gun Dolls graphic novels (see the preceding post). I don’t know if these were random studies or character sketches for his Tommy Gun Girls, but do go to his site (link below) to see more work from his Valentine series, other projects and artwork.

Daniel Cooney 2

https://www.dancooneyart.com

The Tommy Gun Dolls

The Tommy Gun Dolls

I always enjoy a surprise, such as discovering something unknown and unexpected on a comic shop’s graphic novel shelves. A recent example: Daniel Cooney’s The Tommy Gun Dolls, a handsome creator-owned hardcover graphic novel set in Prohibition era San Francisco, with both story and art by Cooney himself, assisted on inks and colors by Leigh Walls and Lisa Gonzales.

It’s 1928, and the city’s practically a war zone with rival Irish, Italian and Chinese mobs duking it out over turf, booze, gambling and prostitution. Meanwhile, at the bawdy Frisky Devil speakeasy-burlesque house (and its adjoining bordello), the showgirls and hookers endure the mobsters’ and customers’ abuse. When one of them is murdered and her grisly death hushed up by cops on the take and a tight-lipped coroner, the ladies take matters into their own hands, egged on by part-time grifter, part-time gambler, part-time snoop and full-time trouble-maker Frankie, the dead girl’s lover, and apparently a refugee from a Bob Fosse musical, complete with a black bob, derby and a complete Sally Bowles ensemble.

Oh yeah, and a tommy gun.

The Tommy Gun Dolls – Volume One: “The Big Takeover”  was a Kickstarter campaign project that resulted in a very handsome book. I don’t know the status of Volume Two – “Double Cross On Maiden Lane”, though the first book clearly was a ‘to-be-continued thing’, so I hope we’ll see that next book and more from Mr. Cooney soon. This is a pretty complex tale full of double-crosses and retro-decadence, all rendered in some mighty nice artwork. Not sure if I buy ‘proto-punk’ Frankie’s torn stockings and unlaced Doc Martens get up in the story’s opening scenes, but let’s give the artist some creatively anachronistic leeway there and just say they were World War One doughboy surplus gear. The boots, that is.

The Tommy Gun Dolls 2

Nasty Pills

Nasty Pills 2

Evil biotech corporation, Golden Dusk, developed a new DNA altering drug called (appropriately) ‘Nasty Pills’, which can modify users’ appearance, health, mood and behavior. But Nasty Pills aren’t being administered to cure diseases, only to breed beautiful, submissive, STD-immune young girls abducted from St. Stephens orphanage to be reconditioned and then auctioned off to the highest bidders as sex slaves. But the evil execs at Golden Dusk didn’t reckon on gun-packing gumshoe May Campbell, who may not care much about the law – or anything – but does care about her one true love, Rebecca, one of the Nasty Pills’ victims. The oversize “crazy pulp book” first issue is from Amigo Comics, written and drawn by ‘Massacre’ along with additional art by Dani Seijas. It’s just a two-issue series, so May Campbell’s campaign of violence and vengeance on millionaires and mobsters will wrap up quickly.

Nasty Pills 1

Betty Bates, Lady Lawyer

Betty Bates 2

Betty Bates, Lady Lawyer (AKA Betty Bates – Attorney at Law, Betty Bates – Lady at Law and just plain ol’ Betty Bates) is one vintage female crimefighter comic series that needs no apologies or caveats. Created by Stanley Charbot, pen name for Bob Powell, and sometimes drawn by artists Al Bryant, Nick Cardy and Alice Kirkpatrick, Betty Bates, Lady Lawyer appeared in Hot Comics for ten years from 1940 through 1950. The early issues’ art is, frankly, pretty crude, though no worse than many other comics were at the time (peek at the earliest Batman issues for comparison). But with Cardy and Bryant wielding the pencils, inking pens and sable brushes later on, there are spots in the series that could rival even some of Matt Baker’s fluid panels.

Betty Bates 1

Consider: Betty Bates wasn’t just one more in a long line of assistants, secretaries or girlfriends. Bates was the D.A. In fact, Betty Bates, Lady Lawyer was the longest running series led by a lawyer – man or woman – till Marvel’s Daredevil passed the ten-year mark, and it was one of the longest running non-super powered/non-costumed comic heroes of the golden age.

Betty Bates 3

But Bates doesn’t spend too much time in the court room, far too busy fighting crooks, looking for trouble or getting caught up in it. Using her wits and falling back on some handy martial arts skills when needed, she normally prevails on her own and without the aid of some hunky cop or boyfriend, though some stories include ‘Larry’, a reporter who’s obviously smitten with the lady lawyer.

Betty Bates 5

Two things leap out at you: The drawings foregoe the then customary ‘good girl art’ look, with its intrusive peekaboo bathing suit and undressing scenes. Similarly, though Betty falls into some bad guys’ clutches, it’s no more frequent than in any other crime comics or costumed superhero series, and no one could label Betty Bates, Lady Lawyer as a ‘damsel in distress’ or ‘women in peril’ comic. In fact, the stories are really quite good, several stand up well even today, and with ten years of material, there’s a lot to read.

Betty Bates Attorney At Law 2

The Gwandanaland Betty Bates – Lady At Law Readers Collection is a hefty volume, with over 400 pages of Betty Bates stories. Strangely, they’re all black and white, though the comics were full color, of course (I’ve included some online finds here, the book too fat to open in my scanner). A couple came from awful originals, were scanned off of second-generation copies or perhaps just poorly scanned and not corrected, and I was pretty disappointed that the publisher would include such barely readable pieces. But with so many in the book, quantity made up for quality…I guess.

I don’t know why, but they also decided to tack on a few unrelated ‘bonus’ pieces: several Jungle Lil and Miss America stories, also with some mighty uneven scanning and in black and white. I’m not much for adventure pulps/comics, whether Jungle Jane’s, Jill’s or Lil’s, and 1940’s era costumed superheroes aren’t really my thing. But I’ll be bringing up the Miss America stories in another post nonetheless (you’ll see why). No idea why Gwandanaland added this material…the Betty Bates, Lady Lawyer stories really made for a nice fat book all on their own.

Betty Bates 4

Decisions, decisions…

Diego Bernard Harley Quinn

The Batman family’s rogues gallery has always been the comic world’s best (IMHO). And though Selina Kyle will always be my favorite, the zany shrink with a kink has become my number two, and it’s whimsical art like this piece by Diego Bernard that makes her so endearing. So hard to choose: Street or costume? At least accessorizing’s always a cinch for Harley Quinn. Just carry a great big mallet.

Gail Ford – Girl Friday

Gail Ford

Homicide Bureau Inspector Madson’s able assistant Gail Ford is rarely seen slogging through routine office chores or clerical duties, more typically enlisted to go undercover to help the police solve vexing cases, palming herself off as everything from a greasy spoon waitress to a department store clerk, a personal maid or a fresh-off-the-bus rube just arrived in the big bad city.

Gail Ford – Girl Friday was created by Gene Leslie and first appeared in Crime Smashers in 1950. Or, depending on the source, she was created by Ray McClelland, and also appeared in Smash Detective magazine as one of that crime fiction pulp’s comics features. I’ll have to leave it up to vintage pulp and comics experts to confirm authorship and venues, none of which matters much to a non-collector like myself. But the 15 stories included in this Gwandanaland trade paperback are supposed to be from 15 consecutive Crime Smashers issues running from 1950-1953. A couple are credited to Pierre Charpentier and Keats Petree.

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Unlike some near-contemporaries like Adolphe Barreaux’ well-known Sally The Sleuth or Queenie Starr, Gail Ford – Girl Friday managed to chase crooks and solve crimes without losing all of her clothes. A smart investigator and quite the daredevil, she kept a revolver handy in her purse and knew how to use it, and had to trade blows more than once with menacing thugs, most of whom learned the hard way just what a high heel can really do when there’s a full-force Gail Ford kick behind it. She almost seems like a prototype for Mickey Spillane’s Velda, right down to the shoulder length Bettie Page style hairdo, complete with neatly trimmed bangs.

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The Gwadanaland book includes no intro, front or back matter, just scans of the comics pages themselves. But it’s a nicely printed book and the material is all quite crisp and readable, considering. The firm aims to publish largely forgotten public domain material, and I’ll be getting more from them for sure.

 

No Going Back.

Tumblr-Wordpress

Not ‘going back’ to Tumblr, but I am expanding to Tumblr. If you’re visiting here and unable to follow this site because you’re not signed up at WordPress or a blog aggregator,  but happen to reside at Tumblr, then you can follow along from there. New posts (starting with August 2019) will automatically appear at thestilettogumshoe.tumblr.com, the short ones appearing intact, longer ones with a feature image, opening text and handy link to the post at this source blog.

The Stiletto Gumshoe blog actually started at Tumblr in Autumn 2018, but I closed that down in December after barely two months of activity and started over on the WordPress platform. Tumblr was going through some changes at the time. I didn’t leave Tumblr in protest (though I know many did) but because some of Tumblr’s more out-there content was troubling, and whether they’ll admit it or not, the platform’s plagued by pornbots, spammers and hackers (and still is, I suspect). For more on that, refer to “A Tumblr Refugee” from late December (link below).

Still Tumblr’s super-simple social media aspect remains a lure. The Stiletto Gumshoe’s been up at WordPress for eight months with 400 posts, just under 4,000 visitors, over 7,500 views and over a thousand Likes. Which is nice, but experienced bloggers would snicker at those numbers, and the site hasn’t even topped a hundred followers yet. While this isn’t the sort of destination that’ll ever draft thousands of followers, there’s not much point to crafting content that goes unseen. Cross posting to Tumblr can only increase exposure.

The Stieltto Gumshoe Dot Com

So, visit however you like: thestilettogumshoe.com. thestilettogumshoe.wordpress.com. thestilettogumshoe.tumblr.com. All routes will lead back here, and given some time, I’ll make a point of retrieving older content to get it posted a bit at a time at Tumblr.

P.S. You can also ogle lots of random visuals (with frequent links back to here) at Pinterest if you like: https://www.pinterest.com/stilettogumshoes/

“A Tumblr Refugee” 12.2018 Post: https://thestilettogumshoe.com/2018/12/27/a-tumblr-refugee/

Steranko’s Hornet

The Green Hornet - Jim Steranko

I think I saw this original painting on exhibit at the one and only local paperback and pulp con I ever attended. This is the Jim Steranko cover art done for the first issue of Now Comics’ 1989 The Green Hornet series. I don’t know if the comics/illustration master was a guest speaker or if the piece was being auctioned off, but it was nice to see an original in the flesh.

It was my one and only pulp con, and I was a little dismayed (or creeped out) by all the kinda-scary guys bypassing oodles of collectible 1930’s – 50’s pulp gems to stock up on bags full of genuinely icky 1960’s – 70’s era hard core porn paperbacks. So my visit to the dealers room was brief.

If you missed it, check out the recent Green Hornet post, link below.

https://wordpress.com/view/thestilettogumshoe.com

 

Enemy Of The People

Lois Lane #2, cover by Nicola Scott

Man, have we hard that rap lately…

Just picked up the first issue of the new Lois Lane 12-issue maxi series this weekend: “Enemy Of The People”, written by Greg Rucka with art by Mike Perkins. It’s a meaty story and already off to a good start. I’ve never been much for the whole Superman universe (despite the CW’s Supergirl show being one of my TV guilty pleasures), and when it comes to the capes-n-tights crowd, it’s always been Batman and the whole Gotham universe for me. But this series seems promising, and I’m on board. Mike Perkins cover art shown above, and the second issue’s Nicola Scott cover art shown below.

Number One Cover art

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