In A Man’s World.

The Innocent Bottle

Lucy Beatrice Malleson (1899 – 1973) wrote general fiction under the Anne Meredith pen name, but more famously as “Anthony Gilbert”, with over 70 mystery novels to her credit, most of those featuring the somewhat groundbreaking (kind of hard-boiled and vulgar) London lawyer Arthur Crook, that long running series beginning in 1936 and continuing to the last novel in 1974, released after the author’s death. Several of Malleson’s Anthony Gilbert novels were adapted to British films in the 1940’s, as well as a 1963 Alfred Hitchcock Hour episode, and two of her short stories were Edgar Award nominees.

Breaking into the crowded field of what many consider the ‘golden age’ of both British and American crime fiction, Lucy Malleson decided to adopt a male pen name and stuck with it, apparently quite successfully…going so far as to pose for her author photo dressed as a man.

Anthony Gilbert Books Montage

I first spotted her re-released Orion Publishing memoir Three-A-Penny — In A Man’s World: The Classic Memoir Of A 1930’s Writer, with a new introduction by Sophie Hannah, at the Crime Fiction Lover blog’s e-newsletter. It looks like the UK edition comes out before Christmas, though a U.S. trade paperback isn’t due till April, 2020. Not sure I can wait till Spring for this one. Methinks some bookstore clerk’s going to be pestered once again this week.

Three-A-Penny

 

PW’s Book Shopping List.

PW

A mid-November issue of Publishers Weekly was stuffed full of interesting things, particularly two special features on mysteries, thrillers & true crime in, “Out Of The Shadows” by Michael J. Seidlinger, and “Open Wounds” by Bridey Heing. The thrust of those two meaty multi-page articles: Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl has sold nearly four million copies in seven years, during which time the mystery/crime fiction/thriller marketplace might feel overtaken by a glut of domestic thrillers helmed by similarly imperfect narrators. But the genre, its subsets and offshoots are an incredibly rich and diverse landscape of distinctive voices, inventive plot devices and milieus, so both Seidlinger and Heing showcased a wide selection of now-debuting and soon-to-arrive novels and true crime titles that aren’t necessarily Gone Girl derivatives (or even include ‘Girl’ in the title, which so many new releases have been doing). I was pleased to spot some I’d already ordered, reserved or even had in hand. And, just as pleased to see more in Seidlinger and Heing’s articles and the adjacent ads for books I mean to get, including:

After All -

After All by Robert Arthur Neff

Are Snakes NecessaryDouble Feature

Hard Case Crime’s Are Snakes Necessary by Brian DePalma and Susan Lehman, and Double Feature by Donald Westlake

Bonita Palms

Bonita Palms by Hal Ross

That Left Turn At Albuquerque

That Left Turn At Albuquerque by Scott Phillips

The Wrong Girl

The Wrong Girl by Donis Casey: ‘The Adventures Of Bianca Dangereuse’

The Beauty DefenseAnd for some non-fiction, The Beauty Defense – Femmes Fatales On Trial by Laura James

 

 

Death on The House.

Dime Detective June 1947

Adapted from Peter Paige’s “Death On The House” opening two-page spread, which appeared in the June 1947 Dime Detective magazine, as seen at the always excellent pulpcovers.com site. I really wish the pulps credited the interior artists. Pulp experts are usually able to ID the cover artists, but the countless stunning (and sometimes, not-so-stunning) B&W interior spot illustrations are mostly doomed to anonymity.

Give this cocktail lounge coquette a simpler hairstyle with bangs, put her in a pair of plain pumps, and this illustration could almost be a new ‘Stiletto Gumshoe’ avatar.

Carrie Cashin

Crime Busters July 1939 - Carrie Cashin

I read my first Carrie Cashin story in Bernard Drew’s excellent Hard-Boiled Dames anthology, but finding more is a challenge, unless you’re ready to fork over significant dollars for collectible pulps (which I’m not). I only recently spotted two Carrie Cashin tales (“Black Queen” and her debut, “White Elephant”) in The Shadow #133 and #138 at Bud Plant’s budsartbooks.com. They’ve been added to my Christmas list, though I suppose I’ll end up ordering them myself after the holidays (no one ever wants to stuff my Christmas stocking with the real fun stuff).

Carrie Cashin 1

Created by Theodore Tinsely, Carrie Cashin appeared in over forty stories in Street & Smith’s Crime Busters and Mystery pulp magazines between 1937 and 1942.  A former department store detective, Carrie looks “like a demure brown-eyed stenographer in a tailored jacket and tweed skirt”, and often defers to her “broad-shouldered assistant Aleck, to allay any clients’ concerns about a woman detecting” when they’re with clients. But Miss Cashin is the real head of the Cash & Carry Detective Agency, the first to leap into danger, and clearly the brains of the outfit. Like Lars Anderson’s Domino Lady, Carrie has a derringer strapped to her thigh beneath her skirt, sometimes surprises with a bigger weapon hidden in her purse, and rarely balks when the bad guys are up for some fisticuffs.  The Hard-Boiled Dames anthology included Tinsley’s “The Riddle In Silk”, in which Carrie (with assistant Aleck in tow) investigates a bloody murder in a remote mansion on the requisite dark and stormy night, which leads them back into the city and ultimately to the waterfront docks on the trail of a stolen pair of silk stockings which “may mean the difference between peace and war in Europe”, the hose containing secret coded messages.

I’ll have to keep looking for an affordable pulp reprint or anthology I’ve overlooked to locate Carrie Cashin in “The Man With The Green Whiskers” novelette from the July 1939 Crime Busters magazine depicted above at the top. Looks like the bad guys got the drop on Carrie this time, and maybe her lilac frock and slip contain something they want bad enough to hold her at gunpoint. Fear not: Carrie will get out this predicament.

Carrie Cashin

 

Dead Fashion Girl

dead fashion girl copy

I’m not sure precisely what “A Situationist Detective Story” is, and rarely read true crime, preferring to indulge in make-believe murder and mayhem. A noir-addict ought to be comfy with unhappy endings, which no one expects in true crime books. We can only look for some satisfactory resolution: The suspect arrested, the crime solved, the guilty tried and sentenced with some measure of justice done for the victim.

There’s no such satisfaction with Jean Mary Townshend’s 1954 murder. Fred Vermorel’s Dead Fashion Girl (2019) deals not only with the crime and initial police investigation, but what the author considers a six-decade cover-up of bungled inquiries and period prejudices, the book as much a look at prim and proper postwar middle-class England and the hush-hush decadence of mid-1950’s London bohemian culture.

Twenty-one-year-old aspiring fashion designer and sometimes model Jean Mary Townshend worked as a theatrical costumer in London’s west end, commuting by train to her parents’ South Ruislip home. Following some after-work fun, she was last seen alive walking home late at night. Her body was discovered the following morning, evidently strangled with her own scarf. Although it was reported at the time (1980’s documents indicating otherwise) that there were no signs of sexual assault, Townshend’s fully clothed body was found with her shoes and underthings carefully removed and left nearby. Other incidents occurred right in this same vicinity over the next few years, with suspicion initially falling on U.S. servicemen from a nearby Air Force base to members of the well-to-do set. Efforts to reopen the investigation or obtain records have been rebuffed and the case remains unsolved.

Dead Fashion Girl is filled with minute details and numerous photos. Yet, what makes the book more interesting than a by-the-numbers police procedural for a true crime neophyte like myself are the portions devoted to the mid-fifties milieus Jean Mary Townshend inhabited along with the authorities’ fixation on the decadent London scene, proto-beatnik and artsy cliques. Vermorel’s known for so-called “anti-biographies” and pop culture books covering the Sex Pistols, Gary Numan, Adam Ant, Kate Bush, Vivienne Westwood, Kate Moss and others. His Dead Fashion Girl provides a good glimpse (especially for an uninformed Yank) of a pre-Mod/pre-Profumo affair London scene. It may leave you uneasy and even furious that Townshend’s killer was never brought to justice and now, over sixty years later, most likely never will be. Sadly, there’s no justice for the Dead Fashion Girl.

Noiquet, continued…

Noiquet-Thriller 1984

More illustration work from Spanish artist Joan Beltran Bofill, known in the European commercial art scene as Noiquet. See a prior post for more examples of this artist’s work…

Noiquet - ThrillerNoiquet - Pavillion In St CloudNoiquet - Situation Grave Hank JansonNoiquet -- Second StringNoiquet - Second String 1963

Noiquet.

Noirquet--1974

Spanish painter Joan Beltran Bofill (1939 – 2009) was best known in fine arts circles as a contemporary Impressionist, his sumptuous light-filled paintings recognized for nostalgic settings and lush, swirling brushwork. But, like so many artists, Joan (don’t be confused, Joan’s a man’s name in this case) juggled both fine art and commercial art careers, and was also a popular European paperback and digest cover illustrator, particularly in the 1960’s and 70’s.

Noiquet - Beltran

Beltran Bofill came from Barcelona, studied at the Casa Lomja (Picasso had been a student there) and the Sant Jordi Fine Arts School. In an effort to keep the easel painting and illustration work separate, the artist worked under the name ‘Noiquet’ for various series of children’s books, Zane Grey westerns, and a number of standalone mystery/crime fiction novels and series, including Hank Janson and Agatha Christie books, Earle Stanley Gardner’s Perry Mason and saucy Carter Brown series. You’ll see hints of American illustrators like Robert McGinnis, Victor Kalin and others in Noiquet’s work, most of them excellent period pieces showcasing a real 60’s/70’s/80’s feel.

Noiquet 1974

Rooting around, I see many covers or even original illustrations questionably credited to Noiquet, some of which simply don’t look at all like the artist’s style, or lack his distinctive and usually prominent signature. Tempting as it may be to show them here, I’ll pass, but this post includes several examples of the artist’s work from the early 1960’s through the mid-80’s. A follow-up tomorrow will include some more…

Noiquet - FBI Series 1968

Noiquet

Noiquet

Delayed Gratification

Crime Fiction

Pestering local bookstore clerks is becoming a hobby. Maybe the owners are pleased, but I think the staff behind the register cringe when I start to pull out my notes, printouts and crumpled scraps of paper with lists of books I’m after. Hey, it’s not my fault they don’t – or won’t – have everything I want. Here’s a few of the mystery/crime fiction titles just ordered or reserved, whether they’ll be in-hand in a few days or, in some cases, not till January (!):

Crime Fiction – A Reader’s Guide (above) by Barry Forshaw, which has been teasing me from multiple blogs, sites and e-newsletters and will finally be on my bookshelves where it belongs. I special ordered the UK edition, since the US book won’t be out till Summer 2020, and I don’t think I can wait.

Under Occupation

Under Occupation by Alan Furst, whose books you can consider military fiction, espionage novels or WWII-era thrillers. Screw the categories. I’ve never missed one of his novels, and none have let me down.

Script For Scandal

Script For Scandal by Renee Patrick, the third Lilian Frost & Edith Head Mystery. ‘Renee Patrick’ is actually the husband and wife team of Vince and Rosemarie Keenan, Vince being the new editor of the Film Noir Foundation’s Noir City magazine.

The Sundown Motel

The Sun Down Motel by Simone St. James. What I’ve read online has me drooling. This is one of those books I’d surely impulse buy for the cover art alone, so I’m glad I read about it, just in case I never spotted it on shelf in a store.

Shamus Dust 2

Shamus Dust by Janet Roger…another beautiful cover that’s a real credit to the graphic designer (sometimes subtle is best). Oh, and a nod to the author for her handsome and chock-full-of-stuff website/blog at janetroger.com. That’s one heck of an author site! Check it out.

Janet Roger Com

We’ll skip the non-mystery/crime fiction books ordered or reserved. But I do read other things, y’know)

More From Bertil Hegland

Bertil Hegland 1

A few more examples of Swedish artist Bertil Hegland’s mystery/crime fiction cover art, the illustrator’s career tragically cut short at age 42 when an accident caused him to lose the use of his hand. Look for the preceding post for more examples of Hegland’s work.

Bertil Hegland 9Bertil Hegland 8Bertil Hegland 7Bertil Hegland 6

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