Damien Lovegrove’s Hollywood Style Reborn

Lovegrove 10

I’d swear that I’ve seen selected images from this series of photos countless times at Pinterest, Tumblr and random blogs and sites, but rarely – if ever! – have I seen the photos credited with any attribution for a photographer, model, source publication…anything.

Lovegrove 1

It didn’t take much digging at all. A simple search engine image match brought me right to photographer Damien Lovegrove’s Pro Photo Nut at prophotonut.com, and a posting from way back in 2013 titled “Film Noir – A Hollywood Style Reborn”.

Lovegrove 2

Model/actress Chloe-Jasmine Whichcello (along with a male co-star who only goes by ‘Frank’, so lets guess he’s the photographer’s assistant or some other fellow) dives into a series of stunningly lit images of a glamorous Hollywood blonde femme fatale, with makeup and hair done by Claudia Lucia Spoto, photo styling done by the model herself, assisted by the photographer, Damien Lovegrove. The project was all shot on location in Pipwell Hall, Northamptonshire in England.

Lovegrove 3

Frame by frame, Lovegrove explains the details of how he arranged the lighting, what equipment was used (all of which is way over my head) and how these techniques created the dramatic mid-20th Century Hollywood cinematic film noir look and feel. I was intrigued, and I know absolutely nothing about photography, at least, the technical end of things.

Lovegrove 4

Well, I’m glad to put these striking images out there with credit where credit’s due for once. And I have to say, that Pipwell Hall in Northamptonshire looked suitably dark and gloomy for this film noir stylistic exercise. So much so, that Damien Lovegrove and his talented associates should have returned at some point for a study in gothic horror visuals, perhaps a tribute to England’s Hammer films, with Ms. Whichello doing a stand-in for Veronica Carlson, Ingrid Pitt or Yutte Stensgaard. Hmmmm…

Lovegrove 5

Link below to the ProPhotoNut site to browse the images and read Damien Lovegrove’s text (which ought to be of particular interest to the less photographically challenged among you). And more images from the project follow in the next post.

Lovegrove 6

 

https://www.prophotonut.com/2013/02/17/film-noir-a-hollywood-style-reborn/

 

 

70’s Decadence

Moments 2

From Vs. magazine’s Fall-Winter 2014/15 issue, an intriguing homage to all that’s decadent in fashion photography – bad boy Helmut Newton, badder-girl Ellen Von Unwerth, and a nod to the 1978 erotic crime thriller Eyes Of Laura Mars (more about that guilty pleasure weird-fest of a flick at thestilettogumshoe.com later…count on it).

Moments 1

The photo suite’s introductory copy explains: “In the cult movie Eyes Of Laura Mars, Faye Dunaway plays a photographer who can see through the eyes of a killer. Here, our cover girl Uma Thurman – a modern-day Dunaway – embodies the thriller’s title role and pays homage to its seductive 70’s styling and provocative imagery (the movie featured stills by Helmut Newton). Who better to capture this iconic marriage of fashion and film than Newton’s seminal successor, Ellen Von Unwerth?”

Well, I’ve seen Von Unwerth get both saucier and nastier than these, and the staged photo shoots, stills and grisly murders in the 1978 film pushed the limits for the time, presaging a host of disturbing visuals soon to populate countless VHS tapes in the ‘erotic thriller’ craze of the early 80’s. But Von Unwerth and Thurman captured some vintage decadence here, to be sure.

Moments 3Moments 4Moments 5Moments 6Moments 7Moments 8Moments 10Moments 9

 

We’ll All Be Jones-ing For Some Jessica Jones.

Jessica Jones 1

A lot of people will be furious (or already are) over the news that Netflix just cancelled its remaining Marvel series, including Jessica Jones. Lets be clear: To me, the Jessica Jones character may be one of the comics world’s best-ever non-costumed-superhero female detective/crime fighting characters. The Netflix series has rightly been showered with awards and nominations, and lead actor Krysten Ritter has done a consistently spectacular job of bringing that complex, dark, flawed yet heroic character to life on screen. Disappointed that it’ll be over soon? You bet.

But surprised? Strangely, not at all.

Jessica Jones 2

Even before the media landscape morphed and fragmented into the multi-platform world that it is today (and this evolution continues, till we won’t recognize ‘television’ in a few short years) I learned the hard way not to become too invested in any series. Enjoy them when they’re around, but be prepared for sudden and disappointing cancellations that often have nothing at all to do with a show’s popularity, critical acclaim or ratings. I think ABC cancelling Agent Carter really did it for me. I really loved that show, and was heartbroken when it ended prematurely. Now, I know better.

Jessica Jones 3

In Jessica Jones’ case, Marvel’s owned by Disney, which will be launching its own platform soon. So, of course they’re pulling valuable properties from what will very soon be their competition.

So it’s just not healthy to let yourself become emotionally invested in a television series, or worse, turn into hardcore fanboys and fangirls, blurring the lines between the actors and the characters they play, writing fanfic and starting blogs destined for obsolescence. I’ll bet there are legions of former WB/CW Buffy The Vampire Slayer and Angel fans still hoping for a renewal with original cast members, even though the Sunnydale teens are all in their 40’s now (just checked, and Charisma ‘Cordelia’ Carpenter is nearing 50).

Jessica Jones 5

So we’ll enjoy the last of Jessica Jones, cross our collective fingers that Disney’s new platform finds space for a continuation, re-start or spinoff, and if so, that Krysten Ritter is available if that happens.

And keep in mind, there are always the comics where it all began.

 

Jessica Jones 4

The Rusty Heller Story

Elizabeth Montgomery The Rusty Heller Story

Everyone probably knows Elizabeth Montgomery (1933 – 1995), daughter of Hollywood golden age actor/director Robert Montgomery, as suburban mom and housewife – and witch – Samantha Stephens in the long-running sixties sitcom Bewitched (1964 – 1972). She got her start on Broadway about ten years earlier, and worked primarily in dramatic roles on many different television series, playing everything from pioneers to jewel thieves. One such early but memorable role is in the second season premier episode of The Untouchables (1959 – 1963), titled “The Rusty Heller Story”, for which she was nominated for an Emmy, the first of nine nominations. Forget the witch’s wiggling nose; Montgomery’s Rusty Heller is a sizzling performance, series star Robert Stack’s favorite episode, this being the only time his no-nonsense Elliot Ness became emotionally involved with a character. Watch The Rusty Heller Story if you can, and you’ll see why even hard as nails Ness fell for her.

Elizabeth Montgomery - The Rusty Heller Story 4

Montgomery plays a wily southern gal transplanted to Prohibition era Chicago, frustrated by her demeaning job as a costumed performer in a nightclub/brothel, very well aware of her sexual allure and eager to put it to work to trade up. With Al Capone in the clink and mobsters jockeying to take over the Chicago mob, Rusty sees an opportunity to use her charms to manipulate first a big time racketeer, then his lawyer and then a mob accountant, while concurrently feeding info to the Feds. And that’s how she meets – and promptly falls hard for the stoic Elliot Ness, who surprisingly falls for her too, ‘bad girl’ or not.

Elizabeth Montgomery - The Rusty Heller Story 3

But the relationship’s doomed, as is Rusty herself, and a climactic gun fight between the mobsters and the Untouchables squad ends with Montgomery’s Rusty Heller catching a slug in the back, then dying in Ness’ arms. It’s pretty powerful stuff for period television, showcasing what a terrific dramatic actor Montgomery really was, though we know her best as an equally good comedienne. Anecdotally, the mob lawyer Montgomery’s Rusty Heller neatly wraps ‘round her little finger is played by actor David White, who’d soon work with her throughout Bewitched’s run, playing advertising agency McMann & Tate’s managing partner and husband Darren Stephens boss, Larry Tate.

Elizabeth Montgomery - The Rusty Heller Story 2

The Untouchables’ “The Rusty Heller Story” is ranked in the top 100 of TV Guide’s Best Series Episodes list. Pretty sure this one’s on YouTube and elsewhere, and well worth watching.

The Untouchables

And, More Manhunt.

Manhunt 6

See the preceding post…

As mentioned in the prior post, I’m eagerly waiting for (and have already pre-ordered) The Best of Manhunt – A Collection Of The Best Of Manhunt Magazine, a forthcoming book due out this summer. But till then, enjoy a few more cover scene shots culled from here and there, and dig the list of authors the magazine showcased. Impressive!

Manhunt 7Manhunt 8Manhunt 5 April 1953

 

 

Manhunt

The Best of Manhunt

I think it’s great that publishers promote forthcoming titles in advance. But I don’t know how the hell I’m supposed to wait until late July for The Best Of Manhunt. Subtitled: “A Collection Of The Best of Manhunt Magazine”, the book is edited by Jeff Vorzimmer, with a foreword by writer Lawrence Block and an afterword by Barry Malzberg, and collects 39 stories from the pages of mid-1950’s pulp magazine that many rightly regard as one of the very best of mystery/crime fiction magazines.

Manhunt 1

The pulp magazine era had mostly died by the time Manhunt magazine debuted in 1952. Mystery and crime fiction migrated to the new and booming paperback market in the postwar era, their garish, spicy covers replaced on the newsstands by countless ‘true crime’ magazines, many of which soon switched to increasingly explicit photo covers and ‘fact-based’ stories full of gruesome and period-sexy photographs.

Manhunt 2

But Manhunt magazine continued to offer monthly doses of hard-boiled short stories and serialized novels from the era’s best writers. Just look at the covers of a few issues…they read like a who’s who of postwar mystery/crime fiction masters: James Cain, Harlan Ellison, Bruno Fischer, Fletcher Flora, David Goodis, Brett Haillday, Evan Hunter, Frank Kane, Henry Kane, Richard Prather, Mickey Spillane, Jack Webb and others. In fact, the magazine even did it’s own ‘best of’ as a Perma Books paperback (see image below) with 13 stories from its pages.

The Best From Manhunt

I may get a real kick out of vintage crime fiction, particularly of the postwar hard-boiled variety, and have bought a number of 1930’s-40’s pulp reprints and trade paperback collections. Doing so has taught me that a lot of the content didn’t quite meet the expectations of the cover art, and was, in fact, kind of dreary. I’m acquisitive, but fortunately, no collector, and unwilling to hand over serious cash for seventy-year-old magazines with questionable contents.

Manhunt 3

One nearby used bookstore occasionally shelves vintage magazines and had a few copies of Manhunt for sale ($25 to $40 each as I recall) and though I didn’t buy, I was allowed to browse, and can say that Manhunt at least looked a cut above the hurried cut-n-paste hack jobs that many of its ‘true crime’ contemporaries really were. But I know from reading about it at many a blog, site and mystery/crime fiction book that Manhunt was considered the one postwar pulp title that gathered together some of the era’s very best talents.

Oh, I’m pre-ordering this book, you can bet on that, five months to wait or not. Till then, enjoy some retro mayhem from the covers of Manhunt magazine, here and in the following post.

Manhunt 4

 

 

She Was Framed.

S Stone 2

Maybe it was a set-up. Maybe she was framed. Maybe she had it coming, who knows? Maybe things would’ve gone down easier if she just went along quietly.

The cops couldn’t hold onto her in Basic Instinct, but actress Sharon Stone’s not getting out of the clink anytime soon in this gritty 2008 photo suite from Ellen von Unwerth, fashion photography’s maestro of mischief and all things delightfully decadent.

S Stone 3S Stone 4S Stone 5S Stone 6S Stone 7

A Touch Of Noir

Touch 4

Just a touch, mind you. Selected images from the photo suite titled “A Touch Of Noir” by Galli-Trevisan Photographers, from the Milan Fashion Photographers site. (Images (c) Galli-Trevisan)

TOuch 3

TOuch 2

TOuch 5

TOuch 6

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑