Mario’s Mara & Bruce

mara corday by mario chavez

Actress, showgirl and model Mara Corday above (who I believe is still with us at age 89, and who I got to see being both fetching and wicked in an old 1959 Peter Gunn episode rerun Saturday night ) and below, Bruce Wayne by artist and illustrator Mario Chavez. Sorry, but the rather prominent ‘gams’ Wayne’s ogling aren’t actually identified by the artist.

bruce wayne by mario chavez

Raymond Leech

Raymond Leach 1

There seems to be something shared among some UK figurative painters. An affinity for times gone by. The ambience of the taverns and dance halls populated by small time grifters and crooks. Peering into dark bedrooms inhabited by estranged lovers.  Scottish painter Jack Vettriano embraced this somewhat ‘noir-ish’ retro world years ago when he abandoned bright sunlit seashore and resort ballroom scenes.

Raymond Leach 2

UK painter Raymond Leech often dwells in similar milieus, though doing so with an entirely different level of draftsmanship and more visibly soft and ‘painterly’ brushwork.Leech’s bio’s say his affection is for the Cornish Newlyn School of art, like paintings by Stanhope Forbes. And that may be the case with Leech’s charming harborside seascapes. But the darker, brooding paintings shown here probe something quite different, but before drawing too many comparisons between Scottish painter Vettriano and Norfolk bred Leech, keep in mind that it’s unwise to fixate on details like the men’s white shirts and suspenders or even the vaguely 1930’s – 1950’s environments. Shared visual cues in both painters’ work are apparent, but dwelling on them is akin to comparing two artists including red barns in their landscapes or sailing ships in their maritime paintings.

Raymond Leach 3

Leech was born 70 years ago in Great Yarmouth, the eastern most point of England jutting out into the beginnings of the North Sea. As a teen he studied both fine art and graphic design at Great Yarmouth College of Art, and like so many artists, started his career as a designer. But growing skill and increasing success with his paintings eventually directed him to pursue a fine arts career. Not restricted to easel work, Leech works interchangeably in oils, watercolor and pastels.

Raymond Leach 4 Heartbreak Hotel

So, what do UK painters like Jack Vettriano and Raymond Leech really share? Both depict figures sharing the same spaces though they’re often remote and disconnected. Desire is evident, but unfulfilled, love an illusion in scenes that suggest it’s really just for sale. There’s a faux nostalgia (though not sentiment) for undefined mid-twentieth century cinema-style settings and a generous bit of peekaboo voyeurism. But what they may share the most is the fine arts world’s reaction: Disdain or outright dismissal from critics, for them and for most narrative artists, save for the cynical few tricky enough to cloak their figurative work in some sense of irony.

See the next post for additional pieces by UK artist Raymond Leech.

Raymond Leach 10

 

Live And Love (With Guns & Bullets)

Live And Love Plank 69

“PlanK-69”? You got me, but that is the name for the concept, gaming and all-around digital artist master, whose work is mostly in the SF/Fantasy/Gaming arena. If you like that sort of thing, check out his/her DeviantArt page, which is huge and overflowing with samples. But tucked right in the middle of countless gaming/superhero characters and SF/Fantasy scenes are a series of intriguing magazine covers, two of which, Live And Love and Guns & Bullets, are shown here. They’re quite different from the rest of PlanK-69’s body of work, and I wish there were more.

Guns And Bullets

The Brighter Side of Noir?

Victor Ostrovsky 1

You get the feeling that Canadian-born author (four thrillers), former Israeli Mossad agent and artist Victor Ostrovsky just doesn’t like to paint eyes. The wide-brimmed hats this Renaissance man’s subjects favor mysteriously shield their gaze in nearly every piece.

Victor Ostrovsky 5

These paintings are an intriguing take on noir-ish tropes, replete with suitably attired gamblers, gangsters and femmes fatales populating his work, but each work done in surprisingly bright hues, night scenes notwithstanding. Look for more of the artist’s work at victorostovsky.com.

VIctor Ostrovsky 6Victor Ostrovsky 2Victor Ostrovsky 4Victor Ostovsky 7

Terry Beatty’s Ms. Tree

Deadly Beloved Art

Artist Terry Beatty’s work for Ms. Tree, the pioneering 1980’s woman detective character he co-created along with writer Max Allan Collins. Shown above, the cover illustration for Collins’ Hard Case Crime standalone 2007 Ms. Tree paperback novel Deadly Beloved.

 

 

 

 

More of Daniel’s ‘Dolls’

Daniel Cooney 1

A couple sketches from writer-artist Daniel Cooney, creator of The Tommy Gun Dolls graphic novels (see the preceding post). I don’t know if these were random studies or character sketches for his Tommy Gun Girls, but do go to his site (link below) to see more work from his Valentine series, other projects and artwork.

Daniel Cooney 2

https://www.dancooneyart.com

Romance Gone Bad.

John Meyer 2

South African artist John Meyer became a professional painter when he turned thirty in the early 1970’s, then went on to become a much sought after portraitist and successful landscape artist. But it’s his narrative work – “enigmatic figures caught in emotional ambiguities” as his bio calls them – that caught my attention, each a poignant (albeit grimly moody) glimpse of noir-ish love affairs, or at least their aftermath. A few are shown here, and if the works remind some viewers a little bit of Jack Vettriano or a little bit of Fabien Perez, then they’re only looking at some details of settings or attitude, because each painting really is Meyer’s own unique style point of view and, like he himself says, filled with ambiguities. Any ‘period’ feel is just that…a look, only. Note some props like contemporary phones (or in painting snot shown here, laptops) and it’s clear that the images are set in a dark elsewhere that’s all now, even when it feels somehow older. I love these.

John MeyerJohn meyer 5John Meyer 4John Meyer 3

Fernando Vicente

When She Was Bad

Fernando Vicente Sanchez, born in Madrid in 1963, largely self-taught and who usually goes by Fernando Vicente, is among Spain’s most popular illustrators, doing everything from book covers to editorial caricatures, magazine and book interiors to fashion illustration, and some rather provocative (and by that, I don’t mean sexy) fine arts work. A sampling of his work is shown here, but there’s much more to be seen at the artist’s site and linked blog, which has both Spanish and English versions.

Artist’s Site Link: https://www.fernandovicente.es/en/

Fernando Vincente Bond?Megan AbbottPhoto IllustrationLa Voluptuosa WahineBABBBN001SSS251210CLPL_M000000000000Fernando Vincenet Bond 2?Fernando Vincente

The Consummate Illustrator

Austin Briggs

Just ordered mine today from Auad Publishing: Austin Briggs – The Consummate Illustrator edited by Manuel Auad, text by David Apatoff, with a foreword by the artist’s son.

Briggs isn’t the first name that’ll come to mind when you think of so-called golden and silver age illustrators from the mid-twentieth century, at least among pulp, mystery and crime fiction enthusiasts. He worked primarily in the glossies (lucky fellow) and in advertising, but his enormous body of work included no shortage of dark and mysterious pieces from high profile magazine story assignments. Check out a previous post of mine on Austin Briggs (link below) for a few more examples of his work and more about the artist.

Austin Briggs Cosmopolitan 1947Austin Briggs

And try the link to Auad Publishing while you’re at it. What an interesting operation. I have a couple Auad books, so I know that Austin Briggs – The Consummate Illustrator will be a handsome piece. Manuel Auad produces a small but impressive list of titles, each a labor of love and honoring classic American and foreign illustrators. These are well made books done in short runs, most sold direct from the publisher, not in stores, and when they’re gone, they’re gone. There’s only so much to browse there, some of the titles already sold out. But the site’s definitely worth a visit for its Links page, with a great list of artists’ and illustration sites you’re bound to probe a bit.

https://thestilettogumshoe.com/2019/07/24/austin-briggs/

auadpublishing.com

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