O’Neill’s Neo-Noir Style.

Peter O'Neill 1

Self-taught painter Peter O’Neill grabbed a Greyhound bus at New York City’s Port Authority in 1996 and never looked back, bound for Florida, where I believe he’s made his home since. In fact, many of his paintings seem to evoke that same South Florida sultriness lifted from a steamy neo-noir like Lawrence Kasdan’s 1981 Body Heat.  More of O’Neill’s work follows in the next post…

Peter O'Neill 2Peter O'Neill 3Peter O'Neill 4

For You…

The Letter

Let’s guess she’s not being handed a birthday card. That envelope can’t possibly contain anything good.

By artist and illustrator Jon Proctor, whose work you’ve likely seen in Caliber, Image, DC and Marvel comics since the late 1990’s, though he’s since retired from comics work.

Jenny’s Got A Gun.

41 derringer John Pacer Fantasy Flight Games

Not talking about the 1989 Aerosmith song (and anyway, that Janie, not Jenny). This is handsome gaming art by Pennsylvania fine artist, concept artist and illustrator John Pacer: “.41 Derringer” above, and “Jenny’s Twin .45’s” below, these two for Fantasy Flight Games. Look for more of the artist’s work at his site, www.johnpacer.com.

Jenny's Twin 45s John Pacer

“Pintu’s” Femmes Fatales.

pinturero fernandez

Maybe better known for fantasy subjects artfully rendered in traditional illustration mediums, photography and digital art, Spanish artist Pinturero Fernandez (AKA “Pintu”) also has a way with retro-pulp and noir-ish femmes fatales. Set aside the space operas and sorceresses, I say, and let’s see more dangerous dames.

Pinteror Fernandez 2pinturero fernandez spain

Kelli Vance: Context is Everything.

Kelli Vance 1

Houston, Texas artist Kelli Vance studied at Texas universities and apparently chose to stick close to home, teaching at various schools since, including her own alma maters, the University of Houston and the Glassell School of Art at the Houston Museum of Fine Arts.

Kelli Vance 2

Her brand of austere realism might recall any number of painters, though the specifics of Vance’s scenes and subjects make me scratch my head to think of accurate comparisons, scrolling through a mental list of various bad-girl/boy artists who like to play with conventions by juxtaposing provocative images in deceptively complacent looking settings. Some of these are pretty brave works depicting unsettling scenes, but with a kind of dark poetry about them that forces you to look…and just keep looking. And if that makes you uneasy, then I’m betting the artist would be pleased.

It’s interesting to consider how context is everything, though. Mystery/crime fiction enthusiasts are accustomed to — even expect — all kinds of murder and mayhem on treasured vintage pulp magazine and postwar paperback covers, treating them as kitschy novelties, often as not. But when those same things are depicted (nowhere near as gruesomely) in an entirely different context — in paintings hanging on a wall in a gallery or museum, for instance — they suddenly become that much more provocative and disturbing. Not drawing conclusions, mind you. I just find myself intrigued.

See more works in a following post…

Kelli Vance 3Kelli Vance 4Kelli Vance 5

The Violent Ones.

The Violent Ones Illustration

I can’t tell you much about Fernando Lamas (married to Esther Williams, spoofed by Billy Crystal on old Saturday Night Live episodes…that Fernando Lamas?) much less about the two feature films he directed, which includes 1967’s The Violent Ones. The film’s grim piece of uncredited movie poster illustration above might look more at home as a duotone spot or spread in a sleazy men’s ‘adventure’ magazine from that same era, the film dealing with a southwestern lawman (Lamas) transporting three rape suspects to a safe trial with a lynch mob on their tail. It’s on Turner Classic Movies’ database, but that doesn’t guarantee it’s a classic. I’ve never seen it, and with no TCM anymore, I don’t imagine I’ll be seeing it soon.  Still, it had an interesting (albeit creepy) poster.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑