Gabe Leonard

Type = ArtScans RGB : Gamma = 2.000

Gabe Leonard came from Wyoming, studied art at the Columbus College Of Art And Design in Ohio, but ended up in California, originally making his mark in the competitive Venice Beach boardwalk art scene. Leonard’s distorted figures and skewed ‘camera angle’ scenes are often inspired by song lyrics, and are reminiscent of Hollywood crime films and westerns. Here are a few to browse, with originals oils and limited edition prints and other news at the artist’s site, gabeleonard.com.

==Type = ArtScans RGB : Gamma = 2.000Gabe Leonard 1

 

Art Of Levi

Avalon Graphic Novel

From Montreal, Quebec concept and matte painting artist Levente Peterffy (formerly from the UK, I think), whose artoflevi.com site is full of stunning work. I’ll share the most ‘noir-ish’ piece from the galleries, a panel from an Avalon graphic novel.

Noisette’s Diner Meeting

Diner Meeting Edouard Noisette

“Diner Meeting” by French artist Edouard Noisette. My question: Is he about to whip a gun out from under his suitjacket? Or more likely, does she have a nice compact .22 tucked inside her purse? Who nows, but lets assume sparks are gonna fly one way or another in this greasy spoon before anyone gets a chance to order.

Abbett’s Silver-Age Masterpieces

run for doom robert abbett

Robert Abbett is but one of the many 20th century illustrators often eclipsed by more famous names like Robert McGinnis, Robert Maguire, James Avati, Belarski, DeSoto and others. And he’s also one of the many artists whose paperback cover and magazine illustration work represents but a tiny part of their artistic career, so many of these academically trained artists well-skilled in and much preferring to work in other subjects altogether…Western art for McGinnis and James Bama, Civil War historical painting for Mort Kunstler, and so on. In Abbett’s case, his illustration fame is definitely overshadowed by his renown as a wildlife, landscape and outdoors artist. Born in Hammond Indiana, Robert Kennedy Abbett (1926 – 2015) studied at the University of Missouri and Purdue University, and once he achieved some success in commercial illustration, relocated to Oakdale Farm in rural Connecticut in 1953. There he became entranced with the autumnal landscapes, hunting and wildlife scenes, which became his trademark in his post-illustration fine arts career.

In fact, even within paperback cover illustration, it’s probably his work on many Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Tarzan, Barsoom and Pellucidar books that brought him the most acclaim, much more than general fiction, crime fiction or any so-called ‘sleaze’ books, which so many illustrators had in their portfolios (even if hidden way in the back).

run for doom kane

Working in a style reminiscent of Mitchell Hooks and other ‘silver age’ artists, Abbett had a tremendous command of figure drawing, but still enjoyed abstracted or vignetted backgrounds and settings, which became the trend in the late 1950’s through mid-1960’s. Bird dogs in New England fields may be his primary legacy, but for me it’s the way so many of his characters look precisely like those I imagine for my own in-progress writing (which is set in 1959, after all). Above is the original art for Henry Kane’s Run For Doom from 1962, as well as a so-so found image of the book cover. Below is one of my favorites: Robert Carroll’s 1961 Champagne At Dawn. No, I don’t mean the book. I don’t have it and never read it, and I’m not sure I’d go looking for a readable copy about ‘fly now, pay later girls’. But change that hair color to a deep brunette shade, and that’s more or less Sharon Gardner, AKA Sasha Garodnowicz, AKA the ‘Stiletto Gumshoe’. Well, maybe a slightly more ‘curvy’ version of Gardner/Garodnowicz/Gumshoe. I can forego a 1961 novel about stewardesses (I assume in 1961 they weren’t flight attendants yet), but I’d give anything to find a decent scan of the original art from that book!

Champagne At Dawn 1961

Walter Stackpool’s Larry Kents

its hell my lovely larry kent 1960

England had Reginald Heade, Australia had Walter Stackpool.

Australian artist and illustrator Walter Stackpool (1916 – 1999) grew up in Queensland and, armed with a scholarship, set off to study art at the Queensland Art School in 1939. But he never finished the course, signing up for the army instead once WWII broke out. After the war, he quickly found work as a sought-after illustrator for book covers, well known for his many, many westerns done for Cleveland Publishing Company, as well as the Invincible Mysteries series in the early 1950’s, and especially the popular Larry Kent series from the mid-1950’s clear through the 70’s. More about that hard-boiled P.I series soon, which ran about 400 titles!

homicide sweet homicide larry kent 1959

A diverse talent, Stackpool was also a popular children’s book illustrator, and later in his career, a respected wildlife artist. Here are three paintings which I believe are all from the Larry Kent “I Hate Crime” paperback originals series, including “It’s Hell, My Lovely” from 1960 (at the top), “Homicide, Sweet Homicide” from 1959 above, and “The Pushover” from 1963 below.

the pushover larry kent 1963

 

Krysdecker’s Lethal Ladies

Ada Wong Krystopher Decker

Look for Krystopher Decker’s work at Art Station and DeviantArt, where the artist also goes by ‘Krysdecker’. He’s facile as can be with superheroes, fantasy pinup style art and even a vampire or two. Now I tend to scroll right past the winged amazons and capes-n-tights crowd, no surprise, but can appreciate his darker spin on Resident Evil’s Ada Wong above, and Natasha Romanova/Black Widow below.

Natasha Romanova by Krystopher Decker

Bill Edwards’ Black & Whites

bill edwards 1964 babe magazine #4

I’ve posted Bill Edwards illustrations before, and will again, hopefully along with some explanatory background on this truly intriguing artist, once I get the time.

Some have claimed that the figures in his full color cover art can look a little stiff or his backgrounds too pedestrian compared to some of his contemporaries, which include the genre’s masters like McGinnis, Maguire and others. I don’t now about that, not being an art critic. I do know that his B&W and duotone interior illustrations — surely done fast, probably not for mega-bucks and normally for the bottom-feeders of the fast-fading pulp magazine marketplace — the so-called ‘mens sweats’ – are full of verve and manage a lot of pop with only a one-color palette. Period-perfect retro-sauciness, too, don’t you think? This particular piece is a Bill Edwards gouache on board for a 1964 issue of Babe magazine.

‘Babe’ magazine? Yikes.

Sinistral’s Femme Fatale

11 femme fatale by sinistral uk

The UK artist goes by the name ‘Sinistral’, at least at Deviantart. Would love to tell you more, but can’t locate any info, except to say the artist clearly has a way with a femme fatale.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑