What’s Beyond The Edges.

Brian Tull 2

Born in 1975, Brian Tull’s only way to remember the 1930’s through 1950’s is through his imagination. Which must be vivid, and which he draws upon to create his enormous photo-realistic paintings and public art murals, each “strategically cropped…sometimes confrontational and often featuring the female figure as protagonist, giving you a subtle glimpse into the characters’ lives. Usually leaving you wondering what or who is beyond the edges.” Retro? Yes, and wonderfully so, but there’s more at work here than mere nostalgia. Check out more of the artist’s work at his site (if only to get a better feel for the size of the paintings): briantull.com.

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Gal Friday

gal friday by chris samnee 2008

No, it’s not vintage Gail Ford – Girl Friday, but a different look at a “Gal Friday’, this piece called just that and by Chris Samnee from 2008.

Tango Noir.

Jorge Botero Lujan 1

Just a dance? No, seems like much more. Intriguing paintings from Jorge Botero Lujan, artfully capturing the steamy embraces of dark ballroom romance.

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Fernanda’s Nancy Drew

Nancy Drew Fernanda Suarez 2

Everyone’s favorite ‘girl detective’ (well, maybe until Veronica Mars stole her thunder): Nancy Drew, as seen here by Santiago, Chile concept artist and illustrator Fernanda Suarez for a Simon & Shuster Nancy Drew update series.

Nancy Drew Fernanda Suarez 1

Dave Lebow

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Yes, they breed artists in Oklahoma too, where painter Dave Lebow was born, though his arts education occurred on the coasts, first in painting at Boston University and then earning his MFA in Experimental Animation at Cal Arts. For most of the first decade of the 2000’s, Lebow worked in animation, but returned to painting full time in 2009. Various sites refer to his style as ‘retro contemporary’, which doesn’t make sense at first, but in a way, is precisely what it is. On one hand, the work pays homage to the fantasy and adventure pulps of the 1930’s, but is reimagined through a contemporary 21stcentury vision. Similarly, his technique is fully traditional, often doing monotone greyscale grisaille underpaintings with oil glazes over those. A visit to the artist’s blog (link below) not only showcases more work, but preparatory sketches, model photos and much more. A lot of the work is epic fantasy oriented (with a wry contemporary twist, mind you), but I’ve collected several here that focus on more noir-ish settings and situations.

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http://davespaintingblog.blogspot.com

Colton Worley

Colton Worley

Dynamite Entertainment’s reboot of The Green Hornet (see prior post) has included two volumes/storylines as well as a parallel Kato – Origins series, with various writers and artists. While not a name I’ve spotted with the current Volume Two series that features Kato’s daughter Mulan assuming The Green Hornet’s mantle, Colton Worley has delivered some gorgeous covers for prior issues and other Dynamite vintage crimefighter and contemporary character titles, including The Shadow, Miss Fury and Jennifer Blood. Background information on Worley seems sparse. I think he’s from Spokane, but don’t hold me to it. But then, bio’s aren’t important. It’s the art that counts. Above: A Noir-ish masterpiece from Kato: Origins Issue 9, and below, some stunning Worley work for Lamont Cranston, The Shadow and other Dynamite Entertainment titles.

4 Colton Worley CoversThe Shadow 1The Shadow 2The Shadow 3The Shadow 4

 

The Missing Witness

perry peterson the missing witness 1954 copy

Perry Peterson (1908-1958) enjoyed a successful career doing illustrations for the more prestigious ‘glossies’ like the Saturday Evening Post, Liberty and Ladies Home Journal, so you won’t find his work on tawdry crime pulps, or even very many paperback covers for that matter. Romantic or comical (or both combined) couples were Peterson’s stock in trade, and he did it well. Still, you sense that the artist might have longed for the occasional mystery subject, and clearly had a nice touch with painting a sense of fear, impending threat and danger, as in his 1954 illustration for “The Missing Witness” by John and Ward Hawkins shown above (the full two-page spread below), plus several other examples shown here.

perry peterson the missing witness 1954

Sadly, Peterson passed away at only 50, his career cut short when magazine illustration assignments and PBO covers were still in demand, so we’ll never know what he might have done with less ‘lighthearted’ subjects. Stunning work from one of the lesser known mid-twentieth century masters, though, aren’t they?

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If Love Was A Red Dress

if love was a red dress

Still digging for more bio information on contemporary realist painter Anwen Keeling. Her stark, shadowy and neo-noirish paintings have me hooked, and a post with more will follow soon. But for now, here’s “If Love Was A Red Dress”, which is as perfect a title as I can imagine.

Hughes, Heels And A Rodent Or Two.

adam hughes 2014

Full color photo-realistic comic covers are where you look for Adam Hughes’ work. Black and white and so utterly simple is not what you expect. Maybe someone’s not expecting her to be packing a lethal looking automatic either. As for the rats (yes, they’re there, just look in the shadows) in this stylish piece of art from 2014…well, you’ll have to explain them to me.

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