This Is Getting Complicated.

Steven Meisel 2009

John Warner’s “Give A Gift That Supports Small Presses: Skip Amazon And Buy Direct” ran online in the 11.25.19 Chicago Tribune (link below) and reappeared in Sunday’s print/online editions’ Biblioracle feature, putting another spin on the whole ‘where to responsibly buy books’ thing.

For many, the Seattle big boy’s the bad boy, and I get that. For others, it’s their primary link to civilization. Chain booksellers have largely vanished. The noble independent booksellers may not be ‘round the corner, but need our support, and if their inventory doesn’t include the titles we’re looking for, they’ll be happy to order them. (Well, the owners are happy to order them…not so certain about some of the clerks.)

Warner’s Tribune piece notes that Amazon is reducing its publishers’ 2019 holiday season orders as a way to deal with ‘congestion issues’ in its warehouses. In some cases, independent publishers have reported devastating order reductions up to 75%.

We often forget just how much (or how little) publishers – small, micro and indie publishers in particular – make on each individual book sale. That $15.95 trade paperback was probably sold at a 45% to 60%+ trade discount. There may be additional co-op ad/promotional funding deducted from the wholesale price. Plus, the publisher pays the freight to distributors’ designated warehouses (Ingram, for example, has several regional distribution centers). And the publisher will have to accept and provide credit for returns later, when booksellers purge their shelves to make room for new books or simply to convert inventory into much-needed cash. Those returns are rarely (if ever) re-salable, often too shopworn to be remaindered and may only end up pulped for pennies.

So, John Warner’s article prompts book buyers to consider buying direct from indie publishers. More cumbersome than a Seattle-session? Sure it is, and possibly a bit more costly too. But, those publishers will make full price on your orders. Some may even offer online coupons, discounts and incentives of their own. Warner highlights several independent publishers like the University of Chicago Press and Coffee House Press, and points out just how easily and happily lost an avid book buyer can become in their online catalogs.

It’d be nice if buying a book didn’t have to be such a morally weighty endeavor, but it is. We want to support everyone: Authors, publishers and retailers alike. If it sometimes feels like too much to grapple with, I understand and agree. My own approach is to spread my book buying dollars around. With holiday gift buying season here, it should be no surprise that many books are on my shopping list. But after reading John Warner’s Chicago Tribune article, I’m definitely going to some small press and independent publishers’ sites to order direct.

I don’t know if it really helps, but it can’t hurt.

Photo: Dorothea Barth Jorgensen, Madisyn Ritland, Viktoriya Sasonkina and Nimue Smit by Steven Meisel for Alberta Feretti, 2009

https://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/books/ct-books-biblioracle-1201-20191125-arlmpbtvjfd5rayrxelxnnqs34-story.html

Order Up.

Lit Hub Screen Grab

Katie Yee’s 11.8.19 Literary Hub piece “Here’s Why You Should Preorder All Your Books From Independent Bookstores” opens by asking “Who doesn’t love an independent bookshop?” and reminds us about charming bookstores from popular films like You’ve Got Mail, Notting Hill and Funny Face. Yee’s article (link below) directs us to Andrea Bartz’ recent Twitter on this very topic as well as Celeste Ng’s 2018 “Bookstores Are The Center of The Literary Ecosystem”, both strongly encouraging (or even admonishing) book buyers to make their purchases from independent booksellers, preordering forthcoming titles in particular, since preorder data can impact booksellers’ ordering choices and even bestseller lists. For those who shrug and point out that they simply don’t have an indie bookseller nearby (which I’m certain comprises a lot of people) there are still alternatives like Indiebound.

Booksotre 2

There was a time not so long ago when you couldn’t pass an urban shopping strip or suburban mall without a chain bookstore. At their peak (if I’ve read accurate sources), there were over 3,200 chain bookstore locations in the U.S. Now there are fewer than a thousand, those being some 600+ Barnes & Noble and 250+ Books-A-Million locations.

B. Dalton (a B&N subsidiary), Borders, its Waldenbooks subsidiary, Crown, and Hastings have vanished. The book distribution arena has also changed, with consolidation among some smaller and regional distributors, and most notably, Baker & Taylor departing the trade book business altogether. Until quite recently, there wasn’t a single independent bookstore near me. I now have one very close by, and a charming store it is. There’s another not too far away, part of a small local chain, though neither of these can boast superstore level title selections. I do have three Barnes & Noble locations reasonably close to home or work.

Support local independent booksellers? I do, and encourage you to do so too. But I won’t hiss at anyone who also shops Barnes & Noble and/or Amazon.

Bookstore 3

I don’t go along with the anti-superstore attitude. Like it or not, Barnes & Noble (under new ownership itself now) is the only standalone operation with enough muscle to pose any credible opposition to Amazon’s complete takeover of the bookselling marketplace. And while I never chase discounts, I do buy from Amazon as well, though typically oddities or OOP titles unavailable elsewhere. Friends and family members in remote rural regions rely on Amazon for books and more, and I suppose if I resided elsewhere, I would too.

I’ll continue to pester bookstore clerks with my screen-cap printouts and scribbled notes to order/preorder books, some few that they’ll be getting anyway, some others that require deep digging to locate. But I won’t feel guilty strolling the aisles at Barnes & Noble, particularly the sprawling magazine racks. And if I can only get some smaller-than-small press title or ancient used book from the behemoth in Seattle, I’ll be glad Amazon exists. Where I get my books isn’t my problem.

Where the hell to keep them all at home is the real challenge.

https://lithub.com/heres-why-you-should-preorder-all-your-books-from-independent-bookstores/

Where Do The Bad Books Go?

By Christopher Lowell 2006

Where do the bad books go? With hardcover fiction ready to top thirty bucks a pop, trade paperbacks routinely going for seventeen/eighteen dollars and so-called ‘rack sized’ or mass-market paperbacks becoming a vanishing breed, where the bad books go really ought to be the fiery furnaces of hell. Bookaholics browsing their credit card statements can get queasy, particularly if some of the bookstore and online charges were for books that kind of, well…sucked.

Of course, a bad book to me could be a cherished favorite of yours…and vice-versa.

My own cozy writing lair (which really is cozy, fortunately, now that Mid-Autumn’s pretending to be a prematurely snowy Winter) has an entire wall of floor-to-ceiling bookcases behind me and a long row of four-shelf bookcases on another wall, all of them jammed full. Only the ‘keepers’ end up on those shelves. There are lots of books bought and read that I’m just not interested in holding onto. Example: I’ve read more current events titles the past three years — things being pretty ‘eventful’ – but will be pleased to consider those books obsolete soon…one way or another. For those and others that I’ve enjoyed but simply don’t wish to keep, there’s a big carton out of sight beside my printer stand for books destined for periodic disposal.

And that’s where the bad books go.

Edson Rosas

Recently I was asked if I love every book I read, since a visitor here only sees rave reviews.  First, to be clear, I don’t think of any of my book posts as ‘book reviews’ or myself a reviewer. I’m just sharing remarks about recently read books with followers/visitors who likely have similar interests. But, it’s true: You won’t find much in the way of negative ‘reviews’ here. Karma, baby. I’ve never understood why self-appointed unpaid book ‘reviewers’ want to bad-mouth books. I’m of the ‘if you don’t have something good to say, say nothing at all’ persuasion. I’ve violated it a time or two with older postwar paperbacks, but those novels were decades old, the authors long deceased. With so many good projects to chat about, why spend time being snarky about the bad ones? (Once again, keeping in mind that my good might be your bad, and vice-versa.)

But, are there bad ones? Good God, yes. Lots.

Bad books usually find their way home with me because of eye-catching cover art. I’m easier to hook than a hungry fish. Good covers are often wrapped around bad books, or books that just don’t interest me once I plunge in. Cozies masquerading as something grittier (or steamier) are frequent culprits. Pretentious self-indulgent ‘literary’ fiction runs a close second.

Adult Architecture

The most painful and recent example that comes to mind wasn’t a particularly expensive mistake. I eagerly looked forward to a novel that caught my eye at multiple sites and print venues. The $16 trade pb sported handsome illustrative retro-pulp cover art and was set in a familiar hard-boiled mystery/crime fiction milieu (or so I thought). But it turned out to be something quite different, and not far in, I began to skip tedious (and shockingly frequent) expository paragraphs and intrusive stop-the-narrative backstory. Nearing halfway I was already skimming, and soon just jumped to the end to see what the resolution of the mystery was (not that I cared very much by that point). For me, that was a bad book. A really, really bad book, but made all the worse when I spotted the author’s thank you to her agent in the acknowledgements…an agent who’d recently rejected me. Let’s assume the agent considered my project a bad book. Or enlisted an intern to crank out thanks-but-no-thanks emails to unread queries…who knows? And no, I won’t mention the title or author name here. But I’ll admit – that one left me bruised (and out the sixteen bucks).

Bad books and just-not-keeper books used to be donated till I learned that they weren’t sent to literacy programs or needy libraries, but merely pulped for pennies-a-pound. Now the baddies are turned in at a used bookstore chain, with whatever I earn (no surprise) usually spent before I can escape. And ‘round here, that’s where bad books go. Hopefully into the hands of readers who don’t think they’re bad. After all, someone thought they were good, good enough to get an agent, acquisition editor and retail buyers’ approval, right? So, I like to think those ‘bad’ books became someone else’s good books. Unless, of course, I see them back on the used bookstore’s shelves a few weeks later.

(c) 2009 Holly Henry

Top photo: Christopher Lowell, 2006; Bookstore window by Edson Rosas, Above (c) 2009 Holly Henry.

Independent Bookstore Day

Indie Bookstores Montage copy

We all have our favorite indie bookstores. I have (and have had) too many to count, much less depict here. Quimby’s, Barbara’s, 57th Street Books, Seminary Co-Op Bookstore, Centuries & Sleuths, Unabridged Books, Women & Children First, Chicago Comics…well, it’d just keep going.

Time was (and not so long ago) that everyone assumed the chains and superstores would bury all the indies. In fact, Barnes & Noble is the only remaining national chain, along with a small number of Books-A-Million stores. Crown, Hastings, Waldenbooks, Border’s, R. B. Dalton – all gone. But so too are Kroch’s & Brentano’s, Book World, Stuart Brent, The Stars Our Destination and so many single storefront or small regional chain booksellers. And that online behemoth does throw its weight around, perhaps more so than ever. Further, we should never ignore the muscle of Walmart, Target, Walgreens and some other general retail chains that carry a modest selection of books. Not many titles, but multiply them by thousands and thousands of stores, and that’s a lot of books being sold in those venues.

three fashion books montage

Mother Nature’s not cooperating in the Midwest today. On the way home Friday, it seemed that everyone was out mowing their lawns. The sun was still out and it was comfy in the sixties. Right now, lunchtime on Saturday the 27th, snow is falling, with a ‘Winter Storm Watch’ (though it’s Spring, and nearly May) and a forecast of 8” of thick wet stuff by 1:00 AM, depending on how the storm moves through the area. Based on how it’s been coming down, the forecast seems accurate. Not exactly a good day for bumming around, perhaps.  But I’ll be out in it shortly, and then inside at least one independent bookstore, where I’ll be sure to do my part…specifically, to buy a book!

ibd logo

Bookstores Above: Quimby’s – Wicker Park, Chicago, Chicago Comics – Boy’s Town, Chicago, Seminary Co-Op Bookstore – Hyde Park, Chicago, Main Street Newstand – Evanston, Centuries & Sleuths – Forest Park, 57th Street Books – Hyde Park, Chicago

Photos: Robert Lethery, Marie Claire France 2015; Deither Krehbiel; Carter Smith, 2006.

 

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