Criminal #6: Can’t Wait

Criminal 6

I just picked up Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillip’s Criminal #4 this past weekend, and now I see that the cover for Criminal #6 just appeared at Sean Phillips’ site on Monday morning – theartofseanphillips.blogspot.uk. Not due out till mid-July…but I’ll be waiting.

Tinsel Town

Masthead

I never saw this five-issue series from Alterna Comics which apparently ran last year, and just happened to stumble across it recently at a blog. I’ve looked for it since with no luck. But a trade pb collecting the whole series is due out this summer, though not till the end of July (which could just as easily mean anywhere from August through Autumn). I suppose I’ll pre-order now.

 

Tinsel Town 1 Cover

 

Sure looks interesting: David Lucarelli writes a story drawn by Henry Ponciano set in the silent film era, when Abigail Moore dreams of becoming a police officer. Of course, women weren’t welcome then, but she takes a job as a studio security officer, where soon enough she’s mixed up in a noir-ish behind the screen mystery. Well, that cover art’s a little bright for ‘noir-ish, but I’m still eager to check this out.

American Century

American Century Montage

Before I discovered the graphic noir-magic of Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips, or the dark delight of Joelle Jones and James Rich (Lady Killer, You Have Killed Me, etc.) and other stand-alone comics and graphic novels, I came across American Century, the DC Vertigo series which ran from 2001 to 2003, co-written by Howard Chaykin and David Tischman, with various artists wielding the pencil, brush and mouse, including Marc Laming, Luke Ross and Lan Medina.

American Century Montage - Glen Orbik

American Century is kind of like old Steve Canyon, Terry And The Pirates or even Wally Woods’ Cannon series, dialed up a notch for contemporary tastes and expectations. Former combat pilot Harry Black fakes his death and assumes the identity of Harry Kraft, setting off on a series of adventures, initially in Latin America, then Hollywood, Chicago, New York, Paris and even among the American south’s backroads bootlegging scene. There’s crime, mystery, thrills and sex – but more, the series a guided tour of 1950’s America, probing the good and the bad of postwar culture, with Harry continually forced to confront racism, blacklisting, corruption and violence wherever he winds up.

American Century 11

Co-writer Howard Chaykin is one of my comics heroes, his Black Kiss and Satellite Sam series particular favorites (more about those at some point). And I owe the American Century series for introducing me to occasional cover artist Glen Orbik (1963 – 2015) who we also see on some Hard Case Crime paperback covers. I think some or all of the American Century series has been collected into one or more trade paperbacks, but I lucked out and snagged the entire run in a couple of used bookstore ‘priced-to-move’ bundles. Which is good since, as I’ve mentioned here before, I rarely brave the comic shops back-issue bins, unwilling, unable or just too intimidated to elbow aside the hard core browsers.

Americna Century 25

Sveta’s Sirens

Sveta Shubina 2

Graphic designer and illustrator Sveta Shubina may make her living doing stylized logotype designs, but it’s her whimsical take on retro hyper-feminized character illustration that finds her popping up all over the web. Look for more of this Rostov-on-Don, Russia artist’s work at Behance, Instagram and her own gallery/shop at Etsy…and there’s a lot to view.

Sveta Shubina 1

New Zealand’s pinup and fashion designer “The Velvet Decolette”(velvetd.com…a “less bitchy, more kitschy pinup posse”) did a brief interview with the artist, and she explained her influences, some of which ought to be obvious, like Dan DeCarlo, Jack Cole and Bill Wenzel, but also early Disney and Fleisher animation. To complete the homage to those mid-twentieth century cartoonists and pinup artists, Shubina not only replicates their drawing style and the period-perfect costuming, but distresses some of the art itself and fades the hues to add a vintage look. Cute stuff.

Madame Medusa

Stumptown

Stumptown-5

One way for rabid readers to keep from going broke is to learn to love their public library. I have. The one closest to me is a charming and well-designed facility, though all that décor apparently left no funds for books. But the next library over is an enormous two-story treasure trove, and its graphic novel section could outdo many comics shops. That’s where I came across writer Greg Rucka and artist Matthew Southworth’s great contemporary hard-boiled series, Stumptown.

Stumptown 1

Dex Parios is my favorite kind of ‘stiletto gumshoe’: Wonderfully flawed. Army vet and inveterate gambler, Dex is both bad-ass and wise-ass, and occasionally a bit of a screw-up. It makes for a lethal combo.

Stumptown 4

Sounds like near-future small screen options won’t be short of intriguing girlz-with-guns and lethal ladies, even though I’m still processing the sad news that Netflix cancelled the amazing Jessica Jones series with Krysten Ritter.

Cobie Smulders

ABC just announced a new Stumptown series by Jason Richman and Ruben Flesicher. Hard-boiled Dex Parios will be played by Canadian actress Jacoba Francisca Maria Smulders, better known as Cobie Smulders. Marvel universe fans know Cobie as S.H.I.E.L.D. agent Maria Hill from the Avengers. TV channel surfers know her as Robin Scherbatsky from syndicated-everywhere How I Met Your Mother sitcom reruns. Seems like a good casting decision to me, and I’m betting she can bring Dex Parios’ hard-boiled grit and glimpses of vulnerability to life on screen just fine. Looking forward to this one. And still enjoying Rucka and Southworth’s comics.

Stumptown Hardcover

Nancy Drew, High School Hipster

Nancy Drew by Tula Lotay

The prior post noted that the CW Network will soon launch a Nancy Drew series, starring Kennedy McMann as the iconic teenage sleuth. From what I can glean of the planned storyline, I get the feeling the series’ inspiration comes less from the classic ‘Carolyn Keene’ books and perhaps more from the Dynamite Entertainment Nancy Drew comics series that started last year.

Nancy Drew 1 by Tula Lotay

In writer Kelly Thompson’s reimagining of the Nancy Drew universe, the plucky girl detective’s in a hipster high school world with old pal Bess and gay punkette George forming her ‘Scooby’ gang of investigators. The interior art is by Jenn St-Onge (look for more of her work at the artist’s site, jennstonge.ca) with each issue released with multiple covers (that annoying trend among greedy comics publishers) and I’ve gone with the ones drawn by British comic and illustration master Tula Lotay. I’m only four issues into the series so I think I have some catching up to do, but it’s a good read for a “Teen+” marketed title, and it sure ‘feels’ a lot like what the CW is touting for its network Nancy Drew series.

Nancy Drew 4Nancy Drew 5

Fight Like A Girl.

Mike Millar olivier coipel The Magic Order

And I’ll just bet she does, so watch out. Spanish comics writer Mark Millar’s The Magic Order (issue 6), with art by French illustrator Olivier Coipel.

Comics Couture

The Haute Life Bruce Weber Shalom Harlow Vogue 1995 2

Fashion magazine creative directors, art directors, stylists and the fashion photographers they engage try some pretty outré things and hunt out truly unlikely locations, from jungles to rooftops, back alleys to motel rooms and abandoned factories. But I’m reasonably sure I’ve never seen anything set in a comic book shop. The copy says the image (or the outfit?) is inspired by that first of ‘supermodels’ from the 1950’s, Suzy Parker. Uhm, okay. Shalom Harlow is shot here by Bruce Weber for an editorial called “The Haute Life” for Vogue back in 1995. Nice dress and all, even with the Spiderman brooch. I’ll take the EC Comics reprints on the bottom shelf though.

Blackjacked & Pistol-Whipped

Crime Does Not Pay

The Crime Does Not Pay comic book series debuted in 1942, the first of its kind to publish such unvarnished, gritty, violent crime tales in a marketplace that had become saturated with good-guys and their sidekicks flitting around in capes and tights, following the success of Superman, Batman and other costumed ‘superheroes’. The title lasted till 1955, though it was pretty watered down by then, following the parental and even Congressional scrutiny of the comic book marketplace.

This handsome trade pb from Dark Horse Books includes two dozen beautifully reproduced vintage Crime Does Not Pay tales, along with an introduction by Brian Azzarello and an informative essay by Denis Kitchen, which details one of the comic’s founders (Bob Wood) own criminal legacy: He arrested for the gruesome murder of his lover in New York’s Gramercy Park Hotel. Seriously, it’s a real life story straight out of Crime Does Not Pay comics. Even 70+ years later, these stories are still pretty, rough, tough and violent. Just how ‘true’ they are…well, who cares?

rime Does Not Pay Back

 

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