At Crime Reads: MWA Nominees On The State Of Crime Writing.

The State Of Crime Writing

Like nearly all writing and publishing events, this year’s Edgar Awards ceremony will occur online, the winners announced by the time you’re seeing this via Twitter on April 30th.

In “The State of Crime Writing In 2020: Part 1 – A Roundtable Discussion With The Nominees For The Mystery Writers Of America’s 2020 Edgar Awards”, Crime Reads gathered two dozen Edgar nominees including Karen Abbott, Maureen Callahan, John McMahon, Mo Moulton, Lara Prescott, Hank Phillippi Ryan and others for a timely roundtable. The discussion runs in two parts, the first appearing today (link below), which included a wide range of topics, such as, “Is there a kind of crime novel overdue for revival or reinvention?” and “What’s the most encouraging recent trend in crime fiction?”

The participants’ replies to “Is there a crime fiction trope you wish would be retired?” were no surprise (answers: Serial killers and the ‘Dead Girl’ trope). On the other hand, I was intrigued by some responses to “What’s the most pressing (non-pandemic) issue facing the crime fiction community today?” Some reinforced the marketplace’s need to foster diverse voices, while others pointed to more pragmatic issues, like money, the growing online piracy problem, and then a real thought-provoking remark about the over-abundance of “bad and self-published fiction”. That one alone could warrant its own roundtable discussion!

Room And Dame Howell Dodd

But don’t settle for my few comments here — follow the link below to Crime Reads to read the first half of this wide-ranging conversation with notable newcomers and genre luminaries alike, and watch for the second part in an upcoming Crime Reads edition. And enjoy the masthead’s modified Howell Dodd painting that originally appeared on a vintage ‘sexy digest’ from Quarter Books (Room And Dame by Gerald Foster) and was later re-used on the 1951 Crime Year Book, that one including “I Was Queen Of The Stag Party Strippers”. Yikes! Well, at least they located one of Dodd’s customary bad girlz holding some reading material instead of a cocktail or gun.

Crime Year Book 1951 Howell Dodd

https://crimereads.com/the-state-of-crime-writing-in-2020-part-1/

 

The Gun In The Lingerie Drawer.

Edmund OBrien

Still working through my overstuffed folder of unread Crime Reads articles and essays…

Poll some fiction writers and I’ll wager they’ll all agree that sex may be the most challenging thing to write about. Oh, choreographing action and violence is tough, no question. But sex? Many writers’ fingers freeze over the keyboard when their plot demands a sex scene.

We routinely sit through shocking and even grisly TV and movie violence without flinching, even though our boyfriend/girlfriend, spouse, parents, siblings or friends are right beside us. But let the clothes come off and the more-than-smooching commence, and suddenly we’re squirming in our seats. Doubly so here in the U.S., where violence as entertainment has long been tolerated and even encouraged, while sex has been sanitized, compartmentalized, crudely packaged in exclusively male-gaze slide-shows and for decades, hidden altogether.

Crime Reads - Sex-Violence

Novelist Amanda Robson’s June, 2018 essay at Crime Reads, “Why Is Sex So Much Harder To Write Than Violence?” (link below) points out that while most people do have sex, most do not experience violence (at least, not the sort that fills mysteries, crime fiction and thrillers). Sex, while personal and intimate, is something most writers, readers and viewers can relate to on a first-hand basis. Violence, less likely so.

Have I experienced violence? Not really. I’ve been in car accidents. I’ve wrestled, been hit and thrown a punch. Who hasn’t, at least as a kid? I’ve cleaned a fish, so I guess I’ve plunged a knife into a living creature. I’ve shot a firearm, but only at targets, and I’ll be fine with never touching a gun again. But I’ve never even seen someone get stabbed or shot, much less been wounded myself. Whatever I write is entirely made up, cherry-picked from and authenticated by our collective TV/Comics/Movies/Novels archive and its vocabulary.

Helen Diaz Prophoto Nut 2

As for sex? Hmmmm…none of your business. Whether it’s straight/gay/other, vanilla or weirdsville, time to gleefully don the frillies and lay out the sashes and toys, or once-a-week obligatory marital bed dreariness, writers might understandably assume (or fear) that readers will identify the writer with the sex scene. Amanda Robson writes, “Most novelists write from the power of their imagination. However, when a novelist writes about sex, people imagine they are writing from their personal experience.  Or, at least, from their sexual fantasies. Because my debut novel Obsession contained a few raunchy scenes, I have been subjected to a barrage of comments – some funny, some lewd, some insulting – including an increase in men hitting on me at parties.” But she goes on to wonder why, as a crime novelist, no one assumed she had a lethal weapon in her pocket.

I’m as guilty as the next wordsmith. Sure, I’ve revised and rewritten chases, gunplay and fight scenes, struggling to get the action onto the page while still maintaining the proper pace and level of excitement. But sex? Good Lord, I revise and rewrite and prune and tweak till my computer’s ready to melt, and not because the scene’s so sizzling hot, only because I keep changing things. First it seems too pervy, then it sounds too flowery, then too specific, then too vague, then too clinical, and then…well, on and on and on. Compound this with writers’ discomfort when trying to adopt a character’s persona: A woman writing from a man’s POV or vice-versa. Writing gay, lesbian or trans, desperate to make the text ring true, but once done, wondering if readers will start to make assumptions. We shouldn’t care. But we’re uptight, fragile, human and we just do. Yet, I’ve never wasted a second worrying that readers will think I can handle a .45 automatic or know what it feels like when a bullet grazes my shoulder and the blood starts to flow.

ilya rashap

Amanda Robson doesn’t provide solutions for writers so much as analyze the situation. I’ll suggest there are no solutions. We’ll continue to peek at the author’s photo on the rear dustjacket flap and imagine them having the raucous orgies meticulously described in Chapter Six, but won’t for a moment presume they personally pack a pistol, blade or brass knuckles. And writers will continue to agonize over one page of eroticism even while they merrily plow through chapter after chapter of crime scenes, gunshots, explosions and fist-fights.

Mystery/crime fiction writer or reader, follow the link and read for yourself what Amanda Robson had to say about all this.

Photos: Edmond O’Brien, Helen Diaz/ProPhotonut, Ilya Rashap

https://crimereads.com/why-is-sex-so-much-harder-to-write-than-violence/

 

Tips For Aspiring Crime Writers Enthralled By The Classics.

The Big Sleep 1978

Deluged with articles and radio/TV news touting ways to pass the time while sheltering at home? Must-see series to binge watch, reading literary classics you skipped in high school, or perhaps reviving dormant hobbies? Sure, like I have time to start a ship in a bottle. The fact is, moving the day job from the office to the writing lair has mostly meant that everything takes twice as long to accomplish. So far, there’s no time for down time.

But one thing I promised to do is to finally catch up on an entire stash of articles and essays from Crime Reads, a fat folder of sloppy screen-caps and still-working links, some a year and half old. I was too busy to read them properly or at all when first spotted, and I mean to get through these things by the time we un-shelter.

How To Write Like Chandler

Dial back with me to July of 2018 for “How To Write Like Chandler Without Becoming A Cliché” by Owen Hill (link below), one of the editors of the amazing The Annotated Big Sleep, along with Pamela Jackson and Anthony Dean Rizzuto (well, and Raymond Chandler, of course), that jumbo 470+ page 2018 Vintage Crime/Black Lizard classic noir/crime fiction fan must-read. I’ve written about it here before. Maybe will again. But for now, it’s Owen Hill’s remarks about just how easy it is to become so enthralled by the genre’s mid-twentieth century roots that the icons, triggers and tropes can permeate our own work…and not necessarily in a good way.

The Annotated Big Sleep

Hill’s essay is subtitled “Tips For Aspiring Crime Writers Enthralled By The Classics” and he opens by listing just a few of the most obvious and iconic scenes we’d automatically associate with Raymond Chandler’s (sometimes by way of Dashiell Hammett’s) work, and he notes, “Today it’s difficult to imagine a detective novel without at least an homage to these and other Chandleresque tropes. What’s a fledgling writer to do? How to make it all seem fresh?”

Aside from avoiding the most worn out clichés and stereotypes, Hill recommends reading. And reading a lot.

Chandler? Well, sure. How can you not? Hill adds James M. Cain, Ross MacDonald and notes that Chandler himself learned second-hand by reading the pulps, especially Earle Stanley Gardner and Hammett. I’ll add in a diverse bunch of notorious characters from James Ellroy to Sandra Scoppettone, Vicki Hendricks and early Megan Abbott, Loren D. Estleman and Stuart Kaminsky, Sue Grafton and George Pellecanos, Max Allan Collins and Sara Gran, both Kanes (Henry and Frank)…and of course, Mickey Spillane. My list could go on and on. You’ll have your own to add.

The Big Sleep 1978 - 2

There’s a very fine line between homage and pastiche, and narrow as the distinction may be, it’s made worse by being blurry and ill-defined. What one reader/writer considers reverent, another sees as laughably hokey. I struggle with this all the time, whether working in period settings (much of my own stuff set in the late 1950’s to very early 1960’s) or in ‘the now’. Once the fellows sport suspenders and fedoras, the women wear hats and gloves, the cars have fat fenders or fins and the gumshoes plunk coins in pay phone slots, a writer’s in treacherous territory, where deadly clichés lurk around every corner.

Hill’s solution is the same one recommended by nearly every writing how-to book. Read, read and read some more…though obviously, leaving a little time for your fingers to tap dance across the keyboard. Makes sense. Only by getting a firm handle on the wide diversity of voices, settings, situations and styles a thriving genre comprises, and by seeing first-hand how those who’ve gone before us have synthesized the genre’s iconography into their own fresh perspectives can anyone possibly hope – however humbly – to put their own spin on things. It’s okay to be enthralled or even to go all fanboy/girl over genre classics, so long as we don’t become clichés ourselves.

So, you’ll indulge me if I include some pics of Robert Mitchum from the 1978 The Big Sleep in this post instead of the more revered, and obvious, Humphrey Bogart as Marlowe himself.

https://crimereads.com/how-to-write-like-chandler-without-becoming-a-cliche/

 

In David Goodis’ Own Words…

Goodis Crime Reads

Molly Odintz’ “David Goodis’ Bleak, Beautiful Vision of Humanity” at Crime Reads this week (link below) is timed for the writer’s March 2, 1917 birthday. Crime Reads’ Senior Editor Odintz opens by recalling a post-college splurge on a Library of America collection of David Goodis novels, only to spill a drink on the precious treasure. But, as she notes, Goodis himself wouldn’t have minded, being a writer who “saw the best of humanity at its worst”. Lets face it: Goodis’ characters probably spilled a drink or two in their time. Odintz’ article is a great read, but the best part may be David Goodis’ own words, over a dozen excerpts chosen from the writers’ work, some of the “bleakest and most beautiful reflections on humanity, all drawn from his noir oeuvre”.

Confession time: I’ve always had mixed feelings about David Goodis, on one hand well aware of noir-hipster cliques’ reverence for the man and his work, yet oddly disappointed by some of it. But that doesn’t mean I haven’t devoured my share, and consider Goodis one of the go-to sources for inspiring doses of troubling yet poetic darkness that is this thing called noir…it’s core themes, not its clichés. Odintz quotes Ed Gorman (R.I.P.): “David Goodis didn’t write novels, he wrote suicide notes.”

Yep, that sums it up pretty well.

David Goodis Screen Shot

If you like, follow the last link below to a David Goodis post from this time last year, with yet another link there to a Los Angeles Review of Books article on the noir maestro, but more importantly, go to Crime Reads to read Molly Odintz’ article, and most of all, David Goodis’ own words.

https://crimereads.com/david-goodis-bleak-beautiful-vision-of-humanity/

https://thestilettogumshoe.com/2019/03/02/david-goodis/

 

Chicago: 1959

The Girls In 3-B

If you’re the blog-reading sort who takes notes, then you’d have caught more than once that my “The Stiletto Gumshoe” work-in-progress is set in Chicago’s ethnic blue-collar bungalow belt in 1959. Why that particular year? It intrigues me because it’s right on the cusp of major social changes that are about to explode in the early 1960’s…but not quite there yet. There’s enough of the old to easily link with the look and feel of so many familiar noir tropes, but so many other things intrude into that comfortable but shadowy black & white movie world and hard-boiled novel milieu to continually hint at the disruptions soon to occur.

Like any writer, I accumulated scads of references from sites, blogs, magazines and books, loaded up on photos, catalogs and ads, all of which I scroll through periodically to keep my head firmly in the right mindset when approaching the keyboard. It’s too easy to picture episodes of I Love Lucy or Father Knows Best and simplify everything into Elvis, poodle skirts and sock hops if imagining the 1950’s, when in fact 1959 probably looked and felt much more like the pre-British Invasion Camelot era.

Crine Reads - Write About The Past

Raymond Fleishchmann, author of How Quickly She Disappears, writes in his 1.24.20 Crimes Reads piece “What We Write About When We Write About The Past” (link below) that “…a successful novel set in the past should certainly include many textural details: that is, depictions of seemingly insignificant ways in which yesteryear differs from today”. But just the same, Fleishchmann points out, “…a successful novel set in the past will intentionally reject many of the stereotypes we have about the past, and as a result that novel’s distant time period might feel surprisingly modern. Certain readers may even mistake this quality for inaccuracy”. He reminds us that in many ways the past isn’t as long-ago as we might suppose and people do, think and feel many of the same things today as they did then. “The human condition defies time,” Fleishchmann says, and I consider that a memorable line.

After browsing photos and ads, there’s nothing better to rely on than books from that era. Note: Not books about that era. From that era.

I read Valerie Taylor’s 1959 The Girls In 3B a few years back and I suppose it even played a part in settling on 1959 for my own work, along with Rona Jaffe’s The Best Of Everything from the previous year (along with its 1959 film adaptation…more about that one later). Valerie Taylor’s (pen name of Velma Young) third novel tells the story of three rural small-town friends – Annice, Pat and Barby – who move to Chicago in search of independence, romance and adventure. Sharing a grungy Hyde Park third floor flat, one signs up for college classes, hoping to be a poet. One gets a clerical job at a publisher and one a stock clerk’s position in a large State Street department store. Though the novel ends with more or less happy (or happy enough) resolutions for each of the three young women, they’ll first endure sexual assaults, unplanned pregnancy/abandonment and the thoroughly ingrained economic, cultural and societal sexism of the time…including predatorial Beatnik boys’ unexpected misogyny. The novel may have been marketed as being racy, though it really isn’t. And it’s been embraced as one of the 1950’s/1960’s era lesbian pulp novels (Taylor’s other books certainly key titles from that era) though only one of the three women ultimately discovers some real happiness with another woman. Still, that’s notable nonetheless, Valerie Taylor recognized for bucking the prevailing vintage lesbian pulp novel trends demanding that gay and lesbian characters always come to bad ends…even if that was only going straight.

james meese the girls in 3-b preliminary

It’d be nice to have the original paperback. The cover’s preliminary art is shown here as well, a frequent post at many vintage pulp/paperback/illustration sites (I’ve seen it credited James Meese but am unsure about that). But I read The Girls In 3B – and just finished re-reading it – in The Feminist Press’ Femmes Fatales series handsome 2012 edition, complete with Lisa Walker’s detailed 20+ page afterword.

With some recent input from a skilled Beta reader in hand (an excellent 4+ page single spaced write-up, no less!) after an over-the-holidays read of my continually re-revising work, The Girls In 3B seemed like an ideal read before attacking my manuscript. And I’m going to squeeze in Rona Jaffe’s The Best Of Everything as well as the movie over the next week, merrily overdosing on 1959 for a while.

https://crimereads.com/what-we-write-about-when-we-write-about-the-past/

 

Playing The Stock Market.

the rap sheetBrowsing the Chicago papers and the New York Times online before the workday commences is a daily routine for me. Call me a news junkie. Similarly, I rely on certain blogs and sites for my daily doses of noir culture and writerly biz, Literary Hub, Crime Reads and J. Kingston Pierce’s The Rap Sheet (link below) key among them. Great for writers? You bet, but just as essential for readers and genre enthusiasts. In The Rap Sheet’s case, there’s often much more than genre goings-on to peruse. Case in point:

The 1.11.20 edition included a link to an August 2019 article from the AIGA Eye On Design site, “Why Do So Many Book Covers Look The Same? Blame Getty Images” by Cory Matteson. The AIGA? That’s the American Institute of Graphic Arts (and do I really need my day job’s turf creeping into my coffee break ‘me-time’?).

AIGA Screen Cap

I’ll wager that, like me, many visitors and followers here at The Stiletto Gumshoe site frequent some of the truly excellent vintage pulp magazine, postwar paperback and classic illustration sites like The Rap Sheet’s affiliate Killer Covers Of The Week, Pulpcovers, Not Pulpcovers, Seattle Mystery Books and others. Betcha you’ve been amused by their periodic examples of classic pulp magazine or vintage paperback cover art re-purposed on another title…as-is, altered, or sometimes quite possibly stolen by a less-than-ethical offshore operation. More in the ‘now’, I get a little dizzy when I cruise the Seattle behemoth’s Kindle books and see how much classic Robert Maguire, McGinnis, Rader, Barton and other artists’ work appears on quickie crime novelettes and sexy-shorties. Let’s just guess those illustrations aren’t in the public domain and some self-styled self-publishers don’t own the originals.

But the Matteson’s AIGA Eye On Design article tackles a different situation altogether: Cover art’s stock photography redundantly appearing on different titles. Matteson notes, “The book cover design world, it turns out, has something of an all-star squad of stock and archival images that show up on book covers time and time again”. The AIGA article isn’t merely pointing out isolated examples of a stock image appearing on two books. The article depicts images used more or less concurrently on a dozen different titles, sometimes in different markets, sometimes not. And it occurs more frequently than you might expect. Just one example from Matteson’s article: Matthias Clamer’s 2004 photo “Naked Woman Sleeping On Gravel” is shown here on just two titles, but it’s actually been used on fifteen books.

Book Cover Duo

Designers have a love-hate relationship with stock imagery: Grateful it’s available when budgets won’t allow for original photography or illustration, but well aware it’s being used by counterparts elsewhere. You need a photo of an apple? A coffee cup, hammer or clock? Are you really going to hire a photographer to shoot one, or just expeditiously snatch one from a stock photo site for a fraction of the cost, downloaded and ready to use now? Most creative resources maintain subscriptions or ‘bank’ credits with their preferred stock photo agencies for easy access, the images ranging from routine objects and insets, to stunning works of photographic art, to the digital building blocks of proprietary photo-composed imagery. Getty is kind of the Cadillac of the bunch, with iStock, CanStock, Shutterstock and others bringing up the rear with more affordable options. But with stock photos, you definitely get what you pay for, both in selection and quality.

Indie book launcher dot com

This topic’s been addressed before – both humorously and seriously – at The Rap Sheet, Goodreads, various pulp illustration sites, indie/self-publishing sites (examples above from the Indie Book Launcher site, for instance). Surely you’ve spotted a memorable book cover’s photo on another title, or in an ad or magazine. I do, and often. Big city art agencies and studios repping the likes of Mike Ludlow, Clement Micarelli, Edwin Georgi and their ilk are long gone. In the mystery/crime fiction marketplace, Hard Case Crime has been the only reliable line showcasing contemporary figurative illustration. They’ve done so right from the start and continue to do so in their new ownership…God bless ‘em. But it’s a photographic world (a digital image world to be precise) and in publishing, it’s understandably a stock image world, realistically dictated by budgets and timetables. Still…that doesn’t excuse the redundant use of the same image. Blame Getty? Not me. I’ll blame inattentive (or disinterested) art directors, graphic designers and inexpert self-publishers.

Rap Sheet Blog Archives

I won’t include a direct link here to Cory Matteson’s AIGA article “Why Do So Many Book Covers Look The Same? Blame Getty Images”. Go to The Rap Sheet yourself to follow the link. It also appears on the Killer Covers of The Week site, and those links are below. Go to either to check out Matteson’s article for an interesting read, but I bet you spend some time at one of Pierce’s sites browsing other stuff. In fact, I defy you not to.

http://therapsheet.blogspot.com/

http://killercoversoftheweek.blogspot.com/

Always Falling For The Bad Girls.

Crime Reads - Strong Women In Mystery

Caroline and Charles Todd, authors of the Ian Rutledge and Bess Crawford mystery series, chatted about memorably strong women literary characters in the January 7thCrime Reads. Whether hero or villain, and without any implicit ratings (like least to most), their informal list ranged from Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca and Rachel in My Cousin Rachel to Harper Lee’s Scout and Bronte’s Catherine Earnshaw, and closer to home in modern mysteries, Sara Paretsky’s V.I. Warshawski and Sue Grafton’s Kinsey Millhone. Their list isn’t intended as a comprehensive chart of powerful female literary characters, but more of a dialog prompt for readers. They list a few with their reasons, then close with, “…How would you change our list? Or add to it? And more importantly, why.”

Crime Reads Montage

Their prompt worked, and got me thinking. The first few who immediately came to mind were Phyllis Dietrichson in Double Indemnity, Bridget Gregory in The Last Seduction, Judith Rashleigh from L.S. Hilton’s Maestra novels and even Selina Kyle/Catwoman and Harley Quinn from the comics world. I stopped once I realized that I was coming up with nothing but villains, completely ignoring the long list of heroic cops, district attorneys, private eyes and plucky amateurs who comprise so much of my own reading (and writing: as in, the ‘Stiletto Gumshoe’ herself). Rebecca Cantrell’s Hannah Vogel? Stumptown’s Dex Parios? James Ziskin’s Eleanora Stone or Robert Eversz’ Nina Zero? Kara Danvers or Kate Kane? Nope. Troublemakers are the women who automatically popped into my head first, whether from novels, film, comics or TV.

There must be a message there, or something I should reckon with.

Caroline and Charles Todd wondered how readers might change or add to their list of memorably strong literary women, and why. Me? I’m still scratching my head and wondering why I thought of bad girlz before the heroes came to mind. And I’ll keep wondering, but you should go to Crimereads.com to read the Todd’s short article.

 

Merry Murder & Mayhem.

Criem Reads Xmas

So many Christmas-themed mystery novels are ‘cozies’ to one degree or another. No surprise, since starry nights, blankets of snow, roaring fires and evergreen bedecked rooms are all pretty…well, cozy. Seriously, kitty-cats, caterers, country cottages all fit in with the spirit of the season a little better than dark urban alleys, sleazy cocktail lounges and drug dens. Still, there’ve been — and continue to be — a lot of holiday themed novels and stories that sidestep the overly cute.

Crime Reads Christmas

Paul French offers up a group of Christmas themed novels and short fiction for our consideration in his 12.9.19 Crime Reads article “The Crime Novels Of Christmas – A Merry Rundown Of Crime Fiction Set During The Holidays”, which lists writers as diverse as James Ellroy, Lee Child and George Pelecanos to Anne Perry, Tasha Alexander and W. Somerset Maugham. Now I can’t imagine Ellroy’s Perfidia making anyone feel all warm ‘n cozy, much less brimming with good will towards their fellow man, but the fun of Christmas themed mystery and crime fiction is the contrast of all the murder and mayhem with the merry time of year. Follow the link to French’s Crime Reads article and see if you don’t want to book a little non-wrapping/caroling/shopping/baking time beside the tree for some serious reading.

https://crimereads.com/the-crime-novels-of-christmas/

Blurred Lines.

The Leopard Man

The Leopard Man (1943)

Crime Reads may not be the first place you’d turn to for talk about horror, even at Halloween time. But it’s definitely worth a visit to read Zach Vasquez’ look at 20 essential films which blur the line between horror and noir (link below). Myself, I’ve always been surprised that more films do don’t do precisely that, the two ‘genres’ sharing some common roots and any number of familiar tropes and stylistic cues. Want to quibble with some of Vasquez’ choices, or toss in your own instead? Go right ahead. I fully concur with several of the article’s selections.

Crime Reads

After all, anything produced by Val Lewton might qualify, and Vasquez’ chooses 1943’s The Leopard Man. Similarly, while the article singles out David Lynch’s 1997 Lost Highway, most anything in Lynch’s body of work will likely merge something horrific with the vaguely noirish, the possibly anachronistically retro, and certainly the just-plain-weird. Vasquez also points to The Eyes of Laura Mars from 1978, that Helmut Newton fashion-kink photo suite brought to life on the big screen, its screenplay adapted from a spec script penned by John Carpenter (Halloween). Or there’s Mickey Rourke and Robert DeNiro in Angel Heart from 1987, and of course, Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1955 dark classic Les Diaboliques.

Les Diaboliques

Les Diaboliques (1955)

Some can argue that many films billed as horror are really just particularly gruesome serial killer thrillers. And others might assert that the moment a film (or story or novel) includes anything remotely supernatural, it no longer qualifies as ‘noir’. But then some people get too hung up on genres and classifications, and I’m not getting into those arguments. Rather, I’ll just encourage you to read Zach Vasquez’ 10.29.19 Crime Reads article “20 Essential Films That Blur The Line Between Horror And Noir” and see for yourself if you don’t find a film you might want to watch come Halloween night.

 

https://crimereads.com/20-essential-films-the-blur-the-line-between-horror-and-noir/

 

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