The Blonde Viper

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Viper Bionda – “The Blonde Viper” – is the original protagonist and title of a series of 1970’s Italian erotic crime comics, with some 30+ issues in its original run, the character then also appearing in other titles like Wallestein and Baghera, stepping far afield from crimes and mere bedroom play and increasingly combatting supernatural threats like vampires and sundry other monsters. All silly stuff, but a lot of the art – covers and interior panels alike – are intriguing. Finding post-able images from Euro-Sleaze comics, pulps, and Giallo crime novels can be challenging since so many are just a little too out-there for me. This one’s from the prince of perversity himself, Emanuelle Taglietti, and may just be one of the tamest pieces of cover art he ever did.

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She’ll Be Dancing On His Grave.

Giovanni Di Stefano Charleston 1976 for Bonnie 171

Who knows what he put her through? Who knows what he did to her? No matter, he got what he deserved, and now she’ll be dancing the Charleston on his grave, if he gets one.

Cover art by Giovanni Di Stefano from 1976 for Gangster Story-Bonnie, the Euro-Sleaze magazine.

Gangster Story Bonnie magazine

 

 

 

Adriano Rocchi

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I’ve looked, and unless I’m misspelling the artist’s name, I can’t find a thing about Adriano Rocchi. Not just online, mind you. I have several long bookshelves crammed with books on vintage paperbacks, pulp magazines, U.S. and European illustrators and sundry sleaze artists. But…nothing. Now lets guess from the examples I stumbled across that Rocchi is one of the many post-WWII era Italian pulp artists working in Giallo paperbacks, crime/horror/sleaze digests and film posters. If you know more, I’m all ears!

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Alain Gourdon: “Aslan”

Une Filles Des Rues Art

I previously posted about the French illustrator Michel Gourdon (Euro-Pulp: Michel Gourdon, 2.1.19) known by some for his pinup art and by others for his numerous euro-sleaze paperback and pulp digest cover illustrations, including Italian Giallo digests.

Michel’s brother was also an artist: Alain Gourdon (1930 – 2014), better known as ‘Aslan’, and like his brother, followed a similar career path, generating numerous euro-pulp, paperback and digest cover illustrations, though better known in Europe and even in the U.S. as a pinup artist.

Une Fille Des RuesAlain Gourdon’s pinup art rep is largely due to his long association with the French men’s magazine Lui (adapted as Oui, in the U.S.) for which he contributed a monthly pinup illustration…particularly explicit illustrations, actually, none of which will be posted here. When American fans of retro-kitsch say ‘pinup’ art, they picture relatively benign (though still a little troubling) postwar era ‘Good Girl Art’ and think of the nod-and-a-wink illustrations from Gil Elvgren, Art Frahm, Alberto Vargas, Zoe Mozert and others. European postwar pinup art, particularly by the 1960’s, was something altogether different. Brown & Bigelow calendars and countless American manufacturers’ posters may have been hung up on military barracks and repair shop walls across the U.S. from the 1930’s through the 60’s. But I can’t imagine where an Aslan pinup could be hung without offending…well, everyone.

That said, Alain Gourdon, who ultimately left France and retired in Canada, had a good run earlier in his career with mystery novels, racy romances and even children’s book series, a few of which are shown here. His style and their overall look was much darker than those from his brother Michael, often as not with stark black backgrounds. THey’re quite different from what was being done at the same time here in the U.S., but in their way, perhaps a bit more noir-ish, you think?

Dossier HathertonEstocade A StockholmMatch NulRazzia Sur Anvers

Euro-Pulp: Michel Gordon

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French illustrator Michel Gourdon was every bit as prolific as many of the more familiar names from 1930’s through 1970’s American pulp magazine and paperback cover art masters like Robert Maguire, Robert McGinnis, Mort Kunstler, Earl Norem and so many others. But biographical or any other info about the artist seems pretty scarce. What I can dig up is in French, and even four years of high school French (mostly forgotten) only equips me for some useless word-here-and-there hunting and pecking. Google translating docs yields gibberish for the most part.

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What I can glean is that Gourdon was born in 1925, spent most of the WWII years studying at the Bordeaux School of Fine Arts, then headed to Paris in 1946, working for the next fifty years or more as one of France’s most popular pulp magazine, men’s magazine, Giallo digest and paperback cover illustrators, while also pursuing more lucrative advertising and film poster assignments. Michel’s brother Alain was also a popular French illustrator, going by the name ‘Aslan’, known mostly for quite explicit pinup art, along with some book and magazine cover work, most of that also pretty racy stuff. Michel Gourdon passed away in 2011.

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Myself, I’m an ardent fan of retro illustration. Mind you, I’m not foolish enough to elevate what were hastily executed commercial assignments to fine art status, nor blind to how salacious so much of it was, nor naïve about just how utterly perverse the 1930’s pulp magazine covers and 1960’s men’s “sweats’ magazines in particular really were. I mean seriously, I understand the value of the hunky hero and damsel-in-distress (or undress) thing to sell crime magazines on a crowded Depression era newsstand, but for all the weirdly fetishistic perversity, American pulps and postwar paperbacks have absolutely nothing on the postwar ‘Euro-Sleaze’ marketplace. If you disagree, just browse some work by Italian illustrators like Alessandro Biffignandi and Emanuele Taglietti for sheer twistedness. Perhaps the French exhibited a little more class. Uhm…a little.

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Books on Michel Gourdon are hard to come by, at least in the U.S., though vintage digests, paperbacks and magazines with Gourdon covers are available for the deep-pocketed collector crowd (which I don’t belong to). There’s much to be found online, not that I’ll post it all here. Some of the work steps over the line between ‘tawdry-retro-kitsch’ and dangerously warped…heck, a couple of these images might be tip-toeing around that line. But pulp-art is what it is, and for good or bad, Michel Gourdon was one of Europe’s postwar pulp masters who surely deserves more recognition among U.S. fans.

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