Still Room In The Trunk?

eugenio recuenco

A gangster and his gun moll? Could be that she’s the leader of the gang, her boy carting luggage and loading the trunk (hopefully not shoving a body or kidnap victim aside to make room for her bags). So lets not make assumptions. A nifty B&W from photographer Eugenio Recuenco. And a pretty nifty Citroen too.

 

A Gun Moll For Giggles.

Natalie Wood And Bob Hope 4

To say that I’m a Natalie Wood fan would be an understatement. This Property Condemned, Inside Daisy Clover, West Side Story, Love With A Proper Stranger…I love them all, the awful 1960’s comedies and the edgy dramas alike. In fact, my in-progress Stiletto Gumshoe (Sharon Gardner, real name Sasha Garodnowicz, a streetwise girl in the ethnic blue-collar bungalow belt of 1959 Chicago’s south side) describes herself as looking more or less like Natalie Wood, “minus some curves, and if a fellow’s had a few and the lights are low” as she likes to put it.

Natalie Wood And Bob Hope 3

Wood’s not the first person you’d picture doing slapstick with comedian Bob Hope, but she was a guest on The Bob Hope Show (variously titled the Chevy Show, The Buick Show and The Chrysler Show depending on the sponsor and dates), tap-dancing in top hat and tails, hamming it up as a 1920’s flapper, trading one-liners as a black leather jacketed juvenile delinquent opposite Hope’s motorcycle cop, or here as ‘scarface’s’ gun moll, a fetching femme fatale who, based on the brief bits available on YouTube, has trouble keeping a straight face or even keeping up with the notorious ad-libber Hope. Makes me wish she managed just one role as a real gun-toting moll, serious crook, or even a ‘stiletto gumshoe’ in her incredible career.

Natalie WoodNatalie Wood And Bob Hope 2Natalie Wood And Bob Hope

 

https://www.pinterest.com/stilettogumshoes/the-stiletto-gumshoe-mood-board/

 

 

No Weapon Required.

Yaroslav Belousov

Her expression leaves no doubt that she’s capable of — or even contemplating — something bad. Really bad. Though the outfit leaves little room to hide a weapon, not even a purse sized .22, I suspect this particular femme fatale has concluded she doesn’t need one. By Russian artist Yaroslav Belousov.

Meow.

three cats by igor shmatov

It’s not Selina Kyle, though it sure could be. In street clothes, that is (well, sort of). “Three Cats”, by Igor Shmatov

Karla Ortiz

Karla Ortiz

Concept artist, illustrator and fine artist Karla Ortiz says she “paints her days away, and that’s how she likes it”, and she’s downright chatty at her blog (karlaortizart.blogpsot.com) about technique, the development of works from sketch through completion and more. Check out more of the artist’s work at karlaortizart.com

Karla Ortiz 3Karla Ortiz 2Karla Ortiz 4

A Dangerous Dame’s Debut

Carol Ohmart

I believe no less an authority on such things than the Film Noir Foundation’s quarterly magazine Noir City consider The Scarlet Hour from 1956 the end of the classic cycle of films noir. I’ll leave that up to film scholars.

The Scarlet Hour Lobby Card

Directed by none other than the great Michael Curtiz, the film was supposed to launch the career of Carol Ohmart (1927 – 2002), a Seattle/Spokane beauty pageant contestant who’d been modeling for famed comics illustrator Milton Caniff as “Copper Calhoun” in his Steve Canyon strip, and who the studio was already promoting as a “female Brando” and the next Marilyn Monroe. But every blonde starlet was probably billed as the next Monroe then. Apparently playing a manipulative, alcoholic schemer didn’t endear Ohmart with movie goers, since she was dropped by Paramount shortly after, and her career never really took off quite as planned. Many know her best as Vincent Price’s nasty wife in The House On Haunted Hill. But I say she made one hell of a great femme fatale in her film debut, even if some highbrow critics claim that The Scarlet Hour was a lackluster finale to film noir’s original classic era.

The Scarlett Hour B&W

L.A., 1990.

Jennifer Tilly 1990

She’d be a fully accredited film noir goddess for her performance in 1996’s Bound if nothing else, though she’s played her share of other femmes fatales and bad girlz. Above is Jennifer Tilly looking languid but still dangerous in an L.A. hotel room from 1990.

Morgan’s Got A Gun.

Morgan Fairchild

There are a lot of things you can bring with you to bed. A good book, a glass of wine, a giggle-inducing toy or just your undivided attention. A gun, on the other hand, may not always be welcome. Perennial television and big screen femme fatale Morgan Fairchild shown above, the film/show source unknown.

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