Easter Bunnies

The Playboy Club 2

Femmes fatales and stiletto gumshoes simply don’t mix well with Easter.

Molly Odintz explains (somewhat tongue in cheek) why Passover is the most ‘noir’ of all Jewish holidays in a 3.20.19 CrimeReads.com article, “10 Reasons Why Passover Is The Noirest Holiday”, though she winds up concluding that, after all, most Jewish holidays can be summed up as “They tried to kill us. We survived. Let’s eat.” Go to Crimereads.com for some serious thoughts along with a seasonal chuckle.

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While Odintz managed handily, I’m stumped trying to find anything remotely connected to both Easter and noir culture. Springtime, marshmallow eggs or coconut covered lamb cakes just don’t belong with dark alleys, gunsels and gun molls or shadowy hot-sheet hotel rooms. The best I can do is to riff on the Easter Bunny, or ‘bunnies’ of a sort…so, alas: Playboy Bunnies.

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NBC’s short-lived 2011 series The Playboy Club only aired three episodes before it was cancelled, though seven were started, with five in the can. Apparently network execs assumed the popularity of AMC’s critically acclaimed Mad Men meant that everyone wanted more of that early 60’s vibe, so ABC brought out the similarly short-lived Pan Am and NBC launched The Playboy Club, set in 1961 and shot on location in Chicago.

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The show wasn’t even on my radar at the time, but I have since seen the pilot or first episode online (everything is online somewhere, isn’t it?) and have to say that A) it wasn’t nearly as offensive as religious conservatives and irate women’s groups contended and B) it was actually pretty good, sort of an eye-candy soap opera melded (much to my surprise) with a healthy dose of neo-noir-ish flavored Second City mobsters and Chicago political corruption (the two going more or less hand-in-hand in real life). But I suppose the few folks who tuned in did so to ogle Amber Heard in a satiny corset and bunny ears, but not enough of them to keep the show afloat for more than three weeks.

Well, I sure as hell wasn’t going to tempt fate with any Easter-related religious noir, and couldn’t come up with any legit Easter-Noir, so bunnies it is, even if only from a cancelled TV series.

Bonnie And Clyde, 1991

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“Bonnie And Bonnie” might be a better title, this vintage looking photo suite recalling the poignant Parker family reunion sequence from the groundbreaking 1967 film Bonnie And Clyde, produced by star Warren Beatty, directed by Arthur Penn, with Burnett Guffrey in charge of cinematography.

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One might argue that photographer Peter Lindbergh’s 1991 Vogue UK shoot is no more historically inaccurate than the 1967 film was, even swapping supermodels Linda Evangelista and Karen Mulder for Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway. But I didn’t mind screenwriters David Newman and Robert Benton playing fast and loose with the Depression era duo’s story anymore than I do Lindbergh, Mulder and Evangelista’s beautiful photos.

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Crime’s So Glamorous

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Edgy fashion and decadent art photography master Ellen von Unwerth has an eye for Bonnie & Clyde style gangsters. Even all that stolen loot won’t make things right when you’re on the run, it seems.

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Bonnie.

elise digby by aram bedrossian

Elise Digby channels Faye Dunaway from Arthur Penn’s groundbreaking 1967 film Bonnie & Clyde, as shot here by photographer Aram Bedrossian.

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