Gal Friday

gal friday by chris samnee 2008

No, it’s not vintage Gail Ford – Girl Friday, but a different look at a “Gal Friday’, this piece called just that and by Chris Samnee from 2008.

And Some More Suarez…

fernanda suarez 2

Some more work from Santiago, Chile concept artist and illustrator Fernanda Suarez, who may be familiar to many for her intriguing artistic rethinks of famous Disney characters. Suarez’ gorgeous work is easily located at Art Station, Tumblr, DeviantArt and elsewhere (a couple links are below to get you started). Now, much of the work is quite witchy, mystic and fantasy oriented, along with some very fetching vampiric looking ladies of the night, but all quite stunning, even if that’s not your thing.  You have to dig deep to locate the slightly more ‘noir-ish’ among the pieces, but its’ well worth the search.

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fernandasuarezartstation.com

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Fernanda’s Nancy Drew

Nancy Drew Fernanda Suarez 2

Everyone’s favorite ‘girl detective’ (well, maybe until Veronica Mars stole her thunder): Nancy Drew, as seen here by Santiago, Chile concept artist and illustrator Fernanda Suarez for a Simon & Shuster Nancy Drew update series.

Nancy Drew Fernanda Suarez 1

Steranko’s Hornet

The Green Hornet - Jim Steranko

I think I saw this original painting on exhibit at the one and only local paperback and pulp con I ever attended. This is the Jim Steranko cover art done for the first issue of Now Comics’ 1989 The Green Hornet series. I don’t know if the comics/illustration master was a guest speaker or if the piece was being auctioned off, but it was nice to see an original in the flesh.

It was my one and only pulp con, and I was a little dismayed (or creeped out) by all the kinda-scary guys bypassing oodles of collectible 1930’s – 50’s pulp gems to stock up on bags full of genuinely icky 1960’s – 70’s era hard core porn paperbacks. So my visit to the dealers room was brief.

If you missed it, check out the recent Green Hornet post, link below.

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Colton Worley

Colton Worley

Dynamite Entertainment’s reboot of The Green Hornet (see prior post) has included two volumes/storylines as well as a parallel Kato – Origins series, with various writers and artists. While not a name I’ve spotted with the current Volume Two series that features Kato’s daughter Mulan assuming The Green Hornet’s mantle, Colton Worley has delivered some gorgeous covers for prior issues and other Dynamite vintage crimefighter and contemporary character titles, including The Shadow, Miss Fury and Jennifer Blood. Background information on Worley seems sparse. I think he’s from Spokane, but don’t hold me to it. But then, bio’s aren’t important. It’s the art that counts. Above: A Noir-ish masterpiece from Kato: Origins Issue 9, and below, some stunning Worley work for Lamont Cranston, The Shadow and other Dynamite Entertainment titles.

4 Colton Worley CoversThe Shadow 1The Shadow 2The Shadow 3The Shadow 4

 

Austin Briggs

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Born in Minnesota, (unbelievably, in a railroad car parked on a spur!), Austin Briggs (1908- 1973) spent his childhood in Detroit, then moved to New York City as a teen, during the Depression, no less, to purse a career as an artist and illustrator. He began with low end ad agency work, his talent for figurative work quickly spotted, and was assigned to paint men and women into completed car ad illustrations. He began doing spot interior B&W’s for the burgeoning pulp magazine marketplace, which led to a job as the assistant to successful comic artist Alex Raymond, working on the Flash Gordon and Secret Agent Corrigan strips.

Austin Briggs 1

After WWII, Briggs hit the big time, doing both paintings and B&W pencil illustrations for the highly competitive ‘glossies’: Redbook, Reader’s Digest and The Saturday Evening Post, and along with illustration luminaries like Norman Rockwell, Robert Fawcett and Jon Whitcomb, was one of the founders of the Famous Artists School. You won’t find Austin Briggs work adorning 1940’s – 1950’s crime paperbacks or sleazy pulp mags, and his 1930’s pulp interior spots are largely lost, mostly unsigned and uncredited. But leave it to the ‘stiletto gumshoe’ to root up a few mystery and crime story illustrations done for the highbrow set nonetheless, for tales like “The Counterfeiters” and “The House Of Terror”.

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The Missing Witness

perry peterson the missing witness 1954 copy

Perry Peterson (1908-1958) enjoyed a successful career doing illustrations for the more prestigious ‘glossies’ like the Saturday Evening Post, Liberty and Ladies Home Journal, so you won’t find his work on tawdry crime pulps, or even very many paperback covers for that matter. Romantic or comical (or both combined) couples were Peterson’s stock in trade, and he did it well. Still, you sense that the artist might have longed for the occasional mystery subject, and clearly had a nice touch with painting a sense of fear, impending threat and danger, as in his 1954 illustration for “The Missing Witness” by John and Ward Hawkins shown above (the full two-page spread below), plus several other examples shown here.

perry peterson the missing witness 1954

Sadly, Peterson passed away at only 50, his career cut short when magazine illustration assignments and PBO covers were still in demand, so we’ll never know what he might have done with less ‘lighthearted’ subjects. Stunning work from one of the lesser known mid-twentieth century masters, though, aren’t they?

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The Cutie.

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Ken Laager’s deceptively simple (but simply stunning) cover art for the Hard Case Crime 2011 edition of Donald Westlake’s The Cutie (originally tiled The Mercenaries, from 1991).

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Hughes, Heels And A Rodent Or Two.

adam hughes 2014

Full color photo-realistic comic covers are where you look for Adam Hughes’ work. Black and white and so utterly simple is not what you expect. Maybe someone’s not expecting her to be packing a lethal looking automatic either. As for the rats (yes, they’re there, just look in the shadows) in this stylish piece of art from 2014…well, you’ll have to explain them to me.

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