Natasha.

Paul Gulacy - Natasha

Sure, I get it: We’re supposed to go for Marvel’s Black Widow when she’s sporting her form-fitting black catsuit. But in artist Paul Gulacy’s capable hands, I think she looks every bit as lethal in a trenchcoat. I’ve posted an example of Gulacy’s take on Natasha Romanova before (link below). He does have a way with black and white, doesn’t he?

Paul Gulacy - Natasha 4Paul Gulacy - Natasha 3Paul Gulacy - Natasha 2

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She’ll Be Dancing On His Grave.

Giovanni Di Stefano Charleston 1976 for Bonnie 171

Who knows what he put her through? Who knows what he did to her? No matter, he got what he deserved, and now she’ll be dancing the Charleston on his grave, if he gets one.

Cover art by Giovanni Di Stefano from 1976 for Gangster Story-Bonnie, the Euro-Sleaze magazine.

Gangster Story Bonnie magazine

 

 

 

Art Of Levi

Avalon Graphic Novel

From Montreal, Quebec concept and matte painting artist Levente Peterffy (formerly from the UK, I think), whose artoflevi.com site is full of stunning work. I’ll share the most ‘noir-ish’ piece from the galleries, a panel from an Avalon graphic novel.

Abbett’s Silver-Age Masterpieces

run for doom robert abbett

Robert Abbett is but one of the many 20th century illustrators often eclipsed by more famous names like Robert McGinnis, Robert Maguire, James Avati, Belarski, DeSoto and others. And he’s also one of the many artists whose paperback cover and magazine illustration work represents but a tiny part of their artistic career, so many of these academically trained artists well-skilled in and much preferring to work in other subjects altogether…Western art for McGinnis and James Bama, Civil War historical painting for Mort Kunstler, and so on. In Abbett’s case, his illustration fame is definitely overshadowed by his renown as a wildlife, landscape and outdoors artist. Born in Hammond Indiana, Robert Kennedy Abbett (1926 – 2015) studied at the University of Missouri and Purdue University, and once he achieved some success in commercial illustration, relocated to Oakdale Farm in rural Connecticut in 1953. There he became entranced with the autumnal landscapes, hunting and wildlife scenes, which became his trademark in his post-illustration fine arts career.

In fact, even within paperback cover illustration, it’s probably his work on many Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Tarzan, Barsoom and Pellucidar books that brought him the most acclaim, much more than general fiction, crime fiction or any so-called ‘sleaze’ books, which so many illustrators had in their portfolios (even if hidden way in the back).

run for doom kane

Working in a style reminiscent of Mitchell Hooks and other ‘silver age’ artists, Abbett had a tremendous command of figure drawing, but still enjoyed abstracted or vignetted backgrounds and settings, which became the trend in the late 1950’s through mid-1960’s. Bird dogs in New England fields may be his primary legacy, but for me it’s the way so many of his characters look precisely like those I imagine for my own in-progress writing (which is set in 1959, after all). Above is the original art for Henry Kane’s Run For Doom from 1962, as well as a so-so found image of the book cover. Below is one of my favorites: Robert Carroll’s 1961 Champagne At Dawn. No, I don’t mean the book. I don’t have it and never read it, and I’m not sure I’d go looking for a readable copy about ‘fly now, pay later girls’. But change that hair color to a deep brunette shade, and that’s more or less Sharon Gardner, AKA Sasha Garodnowicz, AKA the ‘Stiletto Gumshoe’. Well, maybe a slightly more ‘curvy’ version of Gardner/Garodnowicz/Gumshoe. I can forego a 1961 novel about stewardesses (I assume in 1961 they weren’t flight attendants yet), but I’d give anything to find a decent scan of the original art from that book!

Champagne At Dawn 1961

Walter Stackpool’s Larry Kents

its hell my lovely larry kent 1960

England had Reginald Heade, Australia had Walter Stackpool.

Australian artist and illustrator Walter Stackpool (1916 – 1999) grew up in Queensland and, armed with a scholarship, set off to study art at the Queensland Art School in 1939. But he never finished the course, signing up for the army instead once WWII broke out. After the war, he quickly found work as a sought-after illustrator for book covers, well known for his many, many westerns done for Cleveland Publishing Company, as well as the Invincible Mysteries series in the early 1950’s, and especially the popular Larry Kent series from the mid-1950’s clear through the 70’s. More about that hard-boiled P.I series soon, which ran about 400 titles!

homicide sweet homicide larry kent 1959

A diverse talent, Stackpool was also a popular children’s book illustrator, and later in his career, a respected wildlife artist. Here are three paintings which I believe are all from the Larry Kent “I Hate Crime” paperback originals series, including “It’s Hell, My Lovely” from 1960 (at the top), “Homicide, Sweet Homicide” from 1959 above, and “The Pushover” from 1963 below.

the pushover larry kent 1963

 

Krysdecker’s Lethal Ladies

Ada Wong Krystopher Decker

Look for Krystopher Decker’s work at Art Station and DeviantArt, where the artist also goes by ‘Krysdecker’. He’s facile as can be with superheroes, fantasy pinup style art and even a vampire or two. Now I tend to scroll right past the winged amazons and capes-n-tights crowd, no surprise, but can appreciate his darker spin on Resident Evil’s Ada Wong above, and Natasha Romanova/Black Widow below.

Natasha Romanova by Krystopher Decker

Adriano Rocchi

adriano rocchi 2

I’ve looked, and unless I’m misspelling the artist’s name, I can’t find a thing about Adriano Rocchi. Not just online, mind you. I have several long bookshelves crammed with books on vintage paperbacks, pulp magazines, U.S. and European illustrators and sundry sleaze artists. But…nothing. Now lets guess from the examples I stumbled across that Rocchi is one of the many post-WWII era Italian pulp artists working in Giallo paperbacks, crime/horror/sleaze digests and film posters. If you know more, I’m all ears!

adriano rocchi

ArtGerm’s Villainesses

Bat And The Cat

Comics are as good a place as any to look for crime fiction’s bad girlz, DC Comics and the Girlz of Gotham City in particular. Stanley Lau (who uses the brand name Artgerm) renders some of the best versions of them. Go to his site at artgerm.com to view more of the artist’s work and collectibles, but enjoy Selina Kyle, Harleen Frances Qunizel and Pamela Lillian Isley, better known as Catwoman, Harley Quinn and Poison Ivy right here for a start.

Selina KyleDetective COmics 1000

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