Cutting Edge.

Cutting Edge Joyce Carol Oates

I noted in a prior post that on top of channeling book buying dollars to independent booksellers, it seems that we also need to consider ordering small and micro-press titles direct from their publishers as well. I’m game for spreading my resources around, such as they are, and will go direct to Akashic Books (akashicbooks.com) to order Joyce Carol Oates’ Cutting Edge – New Stories of Mystery and Crime by Women Writers.

Akashic is the publisher of the long running “Noir” series: Chicago Noir, New Jersey Noir, Amsterdam Noir…well, name a city or region, and they probably have a noir anthology for it. I believe the last one I talked up here at The Stiletto Gumshoe was the then just-released Milwaukee Noir. And since Akashic promotes “25% off all books every day”, I guess I’ll be back for more soon enough. After all, I can’t expect my local bookseller to stock every city/region in the Akashic Noir series.

As for Cutting Edge:

“Is there a distinctive female noir?” Oates asks in the opening line of the anthology’s introduction. I’ll confess to peeking at it online, pleased to see that the editor’s intro is no slapped together half-pager. “Is there, as some have argued, a distinctive female voice, differing essentially from the male voice?” She goes on to talk about just what mystery, crime and noir really are. “It has been noted that noir isn’t a specific subject matter but rather a sort of (dark) music: a sensibility, a tone, an atmosphere.” Certainly not a genre, and hopefully more than a mere subcategory of mystery/crime fiction, whatever ‘noir’ may be, Oates is certain that there are distinct and surely vital differences between the so-called traditional male noir world and the female. “The particular strength of the female noir vision isn’t a recognizable style but rather a defiantly female, indeed feminist, perspective.”

I was pleased to once have a story included in a hardcover anthology alongside Joyce Carol Oates (pay rate aside). Cutting Edge’s list of well-known and less familiar writers is impressive. The intro describes some very diverse settings, subject, styles and plots. I’ll be buying a lot of books this month, whether for myself or as gifts (surprise!), and I’m really looking forward to Joyce Carol Oates’ Cutting Edge – New Stories of Mystery and Crime by Women Writers.

Strand Magazine: What Else Do You Want?

Strand

If a John Steinbeck 1954 short story (largely unseen in English previously) and a Joyce Carol Oates story (who also has a novella out now from Hard Case Crime) aren’t enough, then perhaps an interview by Andrew F. Gulli with novelist Hank Phillipe Ryan would make you grab the July-November 2019 issue of the Strand Magazine off the stand. I was intrigued by how many of my recent reads were featured in ads or award lists, not all of them new releases, including Edgar Cantero’s This Body’s Not Big Enough For Both Of Us, Laura Lippman’s Sunburn, S.A. Lelchuk’s Save Me From Dangerous Men and Job Copenhaver’s Dodging And Burning. 

 

But my biggest takeaway from this current issue was just how many forthcoming titles I took note of for my own book watch lists. Naturally a new issue of Strand Magazine, Mystery Scene or Publisher’s Weekly will yield a book or two to look for. But for some reason this issue was a cover to cover shout out for new books I need to get. Just a few: Paul Di Filippo’s The Big Get-Even and his The Deadly Kiss-Off,  Lawrence Dudley’s New York Station and Jeffrey Fleishman’s My Detective among them. It’s going to be a busy Fall.

Can’t Go Wrong With EQMM

EQM519-Cover

I understand why publishers prefer readers to subscribe to their magazines, which can sidestep costly distribution and retailer discounting and enable better readership forecasting and print runs. But I happen to like buying my Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine (still called the original title Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine on the perfect-bound spine) at the store. There’s something delightfully retro about those digest-sized books with their flimsy cover stock and pulpy interior paper. Paying a cashier (in cash) and walking out with a copy just feels right, somehow. Like I should be buying a pack of filterless Luckies and some Beechnut gum to go along with it.

EQMM March April 2019

EQMM has been at it for nearly eighty years now. That’s a heck of a lot of crime fiction, and almost too many writers to count when you think about it. I’ve heard some folks dismiss the publication as too soft, old fashioned, or even ‘cozy’, though my response to that is simply, “Hey, have you actually read it?”

The fun of Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine is that you get to read a little bit of everything, and can do so at a reasonable price. I don’t have the new May/June 2019 issue yet and actually just finished the March/April issue, with tales from Bill Pronzini, Joyce Carol Oates and Carolyn Hart. Harley Mazuk’s “The Road From Manzanar” was a sprawling and thought-provoking piece of literary fiction about a former volunteer in the Spanish Civil War now faced with combat again as the U.S. enters WWII, and Mazuk somehow managed to condense this amazing tale down to 18 perfect pages. R. J. Koreto’s “The Girl On The Roof”, a delightfully dark bit of adultery and murder with a good ‘gotcha’ ending, and Robert S. Levinson’s bittersweet Golden Age Hollywood tale “All About Eve” were particular favorites this issue.

In a way, EQMM and the companion digest, Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine are the closest thing we still have to the old pulp magazines. Sure, I could get either for my phone or tablet. But what’s the fun of that? The print digests simply feel right in my hands. There’s that subtle but tangible scent of that newsprint paper stock. And I’m still hoping I’ll stumble across a downtown newsstand or Mom-n-Pop corner store where I can buy my next copy…maybe with a pack of filterless Luckies and some Beechnut gum.

Heck, I don’t even smoke filterless Luckies…

EQMM Dec 1953

 

 

L.A. Noire: The Collected Stories

L.A. Noire 7 - Book

From game to book: Rockstar Games’ popular L.A. Noire game adapted to an anthology: L.A. Noire – The Collected Stories, from Mulholland Books, with 8 hard-boiled/noir-ish tales from some real heavy hitters: Megan Abbott, Lawrence Block, Joe Lansdale, Joyce Carol Oates, Francine Prose, Johnathan Santlofer, Duane Swierczynski and Andrew Vachss.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑