Gunn’s Hart

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Lola Albright played Edie Hart, jazz club chanteuse and girlfriend to Craig Stevens’ private eye Peter Gunn in the 1958 – 1961 ABC TV series of the same name. Actually, her real name — Lola Albright — almost sounds better for a quirky little jazz club singer than her made-up character name. And it was the actress and singer’s real name.

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Lola Jean Albright was born in Akron, Ohio in 1924, juggling small-time singing gigs while modeling in Chicago until a talent scout lured her to Hollywood in 1947. Two years in she got her first break alongside Kirk Douglas in 1949’s Champion, but continued to toil in small parts, B-movies, Westerns and television roles, still working as a model on the side, which included posing for well-known pin-up and ‘good girl art’ painter Gil Elvgren. In 1958 she was cast as Edie Hart in the new Blake Edwards produced ABC series Peter Gunn, doing her own singing in nearly forty episodes, nominated for an Emmy in 1959, while recording several successful record albums. During Peter Gunn’s third and final season she fell for the actor/musician portraying the piano player at Mother’s, the little bohemian jazz club private eye Peter Gunn used as his unofficial headquarters, and the two were married from 1961 to 1975. Albright passed away at age 92 in 2017.

A Cold Wind In August

If you get a chance to catch some Peter Gunn episodes, check them out. Hopefully they’ll be the dark, suspenseful and gritty ones, which are a real treat. As is Lola Albright’s breezy performances…and her singing, if you’re fortunate enough to view one in which she performs.

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Raymond Leech

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There seems to be something shared among some UK figurative painters. An affinity for times gone by. The ambience of the taverns and dance halls populated by small time grifters and crooks. Peering into dark bedrooms inhabited by estranged lovers.  Scottish painter Jack Vettriano embraced this somewhat ‘noir-ish’ retro world years ago when he abandoned bright sunlit seashore and resort ballroom scenes.

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UK painter Raymond Leech often dwells in similar milieus, though doing so with an entirely different level of draftsmanship and more visibly soft and ‘painterly’ brushwork.Leech’s bio’s say his affection is for the Cornish Newlyn School of art, like paintings by Stanhope Forbes. And that may be the case with Leech’s charming harborside seascapes. But the darker, brooding paintings shown here probe something quite different, but before drawing too many comparisons between Scottish painter Vettriano and Norfolk bred Leech, keep in mind that it’s unwise to fixate on details like the men’s white shirts and suspenders or even the vaguely 1930’s – 1950’s environments. Shared visual cues in both painters’ work are apparent, but dwelling on them is akin to comparing two artists including red barns in their landscapes or sailing ships in their maritime paintings.

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Leech was born 70 years ago in Great Yarmouth, the eastern most point of England jutting out into the beginnings of the North Sea. As a teen he studied both fine art and graphic design at Great Yarmouth College of Art, and like so many artists, started his career as a designer. But growing skill and increasing success with his paintings eventually directed him to pursue a fine arts career. Not restricted to easel work, Leech works interchangeably in oils, watercolor and pastels.

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So, what do UK painters like Jack Vettriano and Raymond Leech really share? Both depict figures sharing the same spaces though they’re often remote and disconnected. Desire is evident, but unfulfilled, love an illusion in scenes that suggest it’s really just for sale. There’s a faux nostalgia (though not sentiment) for undefined mid-twentieth century cinema-style settings and a generous bit of peekaboo voyeurism. But what they may share the most is the fine arts world’s reaction: Disdain or outright dismissal from critics, for them and for most narrative artists, save for the cynical few tricky enough to cloak their figurative work in some sense of irony.

See the next post for additional pieces by UK artist Raymond Leech.

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Grande’s Got A Gun

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I’d be fibbing if I claimed to know a lot about singer/songwriter/actress Ariana Grande, other than knowing she’s a major pop star, and had a long run playing endearing and quirky Cat Valentine on Nickelodeon’s Victorious and then on Sam & Cat before mega-stardom beckoned. Hey, I’m not pop culture-clueless, y’know.

But all it takes is a purse-sized pistol and trenchcoat to turn any celebrity – even the adorable ones – into a noir-ish femme fatale or ‘stiletto gumshoe’, and here’s Grande doing just that for Complex magazine (from 2013, I think).

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Gun Crazy

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Nothing to do with the iconic Joseph H. Lewis 1950 cult classic film noir Gun Crazy co-scripted by Dalton Trumbo for the King Brothers. These are selected images from the “Gun Crazy” series by photographer Vladimir Volf Kirilin.

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Erik Almas

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San Francisco area photographer Erik Almas came from Norway to the U.S to attend the Academy of Art University and then ended up staying. Almas is perhaps best known for his cinematic styled fashion, advertising and editorial work, much of it done with his unique compositing techniques. Take a look for yourself at erikalmas.com or the photographer’s blog at blog.erikalmas.com.

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The Brighter Side of Noir?

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You get the feeling that Canadian-born author (four thrillers), former Israeli Mossad agent and artist Victor Ostrovsky just doesn’t like to paint eyes. The wide-brimmed hats this Renaissance man’s subjects favor mysteriously shield their gaze in nearly every piece.

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These paintings are an intriguing take on noir-ish tropes, replete with suitably attired gamblers, gangsters and femmes fatales populating his work, but each work done in surprisingly bright hues, night scenes notwithstanding. Look for more of the artist’s work at victorostovsky.com.

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Too Many For Magda.

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How many mystery and noir-ish crime stories begin in a bar? Start things out with a drunk, a B-girl, a pickup or a clandestine meeting. Sure, good things can happen over a drink, and bad things are bound to occur over too many. Argentine model Magda Laguinge acts like she’s had a few or a few too many in this 2013 B&W fashion editorial from Interview Germany, shot by Sebastian Faena and directed by Julia von Boehm.

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Spade & Archer

Chris Knight Photography

Look hard, I do believe it reads “Spade & Archer” on that frosted glass door. The photo’s by Chris Knight, born in Germany and (I think) currently living and working Florida, best known for his opulently staged portraits, cinematic styled editorial work and as the author of The Dramatic Portrait. Look for more of his work at chrisknightphoto.com.

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