Ingrid Boot: Noir Via New Zealand

Ingrid Boot 6

I first spotted one Ingrid Boot painting at Noirsville (www.noirsville.blogspot.com), which promptly sent me hunting for more info about this artist.

Background info is sparse, but the intriguing artwork speaks for itself.

Ingrid Boot 3

Making her home in New Zealand since 2000, Ingrid Boot studied art at Westminster University in London and completed a degree in Illustration at De Monfort. The artist’s work ranges from glamorous retro nostalgia lifted right from a vintage Vogue magazine editorial (go to the artist’s own site at http://www.ingrid.co.nz to view more of those), to ominous yet alluring film noir-inspired pieces, those comprising a 2018 solo show, aptly titled “Film Noir”, at the Bread & Butter Gallery. More from this incredible painter follows in the next post…

Ingrid Boot 4Ingrid Boot 14 Crime Of PassionIngrid Boot 15 - Fallen AngelIngrid Boot Exhibit Poster

Bahner’s Hand-Colored Femmes-Noir.

Bertran Bahmer 4

German photographer and photo-artist Bertram Bahner may be better known in some circles by his “Kim Anderson” brand name, which he used for a long running series of charming hand-colored black & white children’s photos, popular in posters, prints and licensed to greeting cards. Born in 1959, Bahner originally worked in advertising and fashion photography, his sometimes provocative black & white images catching the eye of Verkerke Reproukties, a Dutch art print, poster and greeting card conglomerate. By the mid-1990’s, Bahner had begun photographing his own children, hand coloring the prints (a truly dying art now in a digital photography/Photoshop era) and moved to Switzerland to pursue that work full-time.

Bertran Bahmer 1

But his distinctive hand-colored work graces some wonderfully neo-noirish images from his earlier advertising, editorial and fashion work, like these shown here. ‘Femmes Fatales’ indeed, and a visual reminder of how brimmed hats are such an integral part of femme-noir iconography.

Bertran Bahmer 2Bertran Bahmer 5Bertran Bahmer 6Bertran Bahmer 7

More Than Barbarians (If Given A Chance).

boris vallejo 1967

Several cult-fave illustrators like Frank Frazetta, James Bama or Basil Gogos, will always be linked to SF/Fantasy and Horror. Even moreso with Boris Vallejo, known almost exclusively as a fantasy artist, with infrequent forays into movie poster work (though even those were clearly assigned to capitalize on his fantasy style).

Boris Vallejo was born in Peru in 1941, started painting at age 13 and got his first paying work at only 16. He attended the Escuela Nacional Superior Autonoma de Bellas Artes on a five-year scholarship, then worked locally for a few years before emigrating to the more lucrative U.S. marketplace in 1964. The U.S. is also where Vallejo met his partner and, ultimately, wife-to-be, Texan Julie Bell, a fellow fantasy artist with her own considerable rep, though in recent years she’s been transitioning into an award-winning wildlife painter.

Hatchett 1976

Yes, we know Boris Vallejo for sword-wielding nearly-naked winged fantasy femmes. But seeing what the master illustrator could do with other subjects makes me wish he (and others among the comics and fantasy art scenes) took a crack at crime/pulp/noir subjects more often. I’ve previously shown Vallejo’s cover art for Lee McGraw’s 1976 hard-boiled private eye novel Hatchett (link below and an image above), and this post also shows “At The Door” from 1994 (below) and an intriguing bit of pencil work from 1967 at the top. There’s almost a familiar hint of Robert McGinnis or Ron Lesser evident in that sketch, and I’m liking it.

At The Door 1994

I’ll always appreciate the skill employed by so fantasy artists’ elf maidens, aliens, angels, demons and warriors, even though the SF/Fantasy genres aren’t my thing. But when I see those talented illustrators’ work, it makes me wish that more would take a closer look at the thugs, gumshoes, femmes fatales and midnight lovers lurking in the noir shadows.

https://thestilettogumshoe.tumblr.com/post/188674058874/just-a-few-years-too-early-perhaps-lee

Escaping Camp Santa

Escaping Camp Santa Emil Landgreen

I’m sure I posted this lasted year, but nifty art is worth repeating. “Escaping Camp Santa”, a pulp-flavored Noir-Noel promotional piece from talented illustrator, designer and concept artist Emil Landgreen.

Got A Wrench?

vogue miami 1975

Sometimes you just have to get your hands dirty. Overalls might be better suited to the task, but it’s not as if they’re doing a lube job. Let’s just assume that someone’s really going to be surprised when he turns the ignition key. Serves him right for driving a station wagon.

Vintage Helmut Newton from a 1975 Miami photoshoot.

Helmut Newton

What Do You Wear To A Break-In?

Rianne ten Haken 1

A sleek black jumpsuit, soft sole shoes and hair tucked under a knit cap would seem like optimal cat burglar attire. Of course, if your name’s Selina Kyle, you could go with night vision goggles and cat ears instead. Couture frocks, patterned hose and heels might be a suitable ensemble for a boutique clerk’s job, but destined for ruin if burglary’s your trade.

Rianne ten Haken 2

Not so for Rianne ten Haken, apparently, who’s shot here by photographer David Burton in a 2012 Elle Russia photo suite. Maybe Haken’s adhered to that old saw about dressing for the position you aspire to, not the one you’re currently in. And who knows? Maybe she’ll have her own opulent digs…once she fences all that loot, that is.

And don’t ask what the editorial’s title is. I don’t speak Russian.

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Adriana, The Femme Fatale

Adriana Lima Vogue Brazil 2013 1

A sleek black dress, heels and hose, a cigarette smoking away…and if looks could kill, then hers say murder. But it’s not a saucy scene from a retro noir in a steamy South American setting. It’s model Adriana Lima posing for Vogue Brazil in an editorial shot by Giampaolo Sgura.

Spy Story

‘Spy Story’ Shalom Harlow by Ellen Von Unwerth

If you’re foolish enough to be wandering around a dark subway tunnel, and more foolish still to approach the woman in black lurking down there, then you deserve whatever happens to you. This is Shalom Harlow by Ellen von Unwerth from a fashion editorial titled “Spy Story”.

 

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