Why Will No-One Publish My Novel?

Why Will No-One Publish My Novel?

Fay Weldon’s Why Will No-One Publish My Novel? A Handbook For The Rejected Writer was a library find from this past weekend, but I’ll get my own copy now to keep on shelf beside the very few other writer’s how-to books I cherish like Stephen King’s On Writing (my favorite), Lawrence Block’s Writing The Novel From Plot To Print To Pixels, Elements Of Fiction by Walter Mosely or Writing Mysteries edited by Sue Grafton.

It would’ve been easy to browse right past this little gem of a book, only 4.5” x 7” with extra-heavy carboard covers like a children’s book. But I’m so glad I spotted it. Weldon’s book is a quick read, compiling a series of essays addressing the many, many reasons a writer’s projects are rejected (or simply overlooked), including all the common mistakes writers make from manuscript through submission, while also probing publishing industry issues that inevitably work against writers. The tone’s light-hearted and chatty, particularly in the first third of the book. Weldon’s wise words will get their share of knowing nods from writers in the trenches, cruel truths relayed along with more than a few chuckles. I challenge anyone – writer or not – not to laugh at Weldon’s imaginary literary agency meeting in her sixth chapter.

Fay Weldon Books

I often forego writer’s books that I probably ought to read, in-store skimming suggesting the content’s the same ol’ stuff and not worth the money, or just as often, unsure what I’ll learn from a how-to book’s author with a skimpy resume of their own (no shortage of those among Kindle and e-books). Maybe that’s why I keep returning for re-reads with King, Block, Grafton, Mosley and a few others. Fay Weldon may not be as familiar a name in the U.S as in the UK, but she’s been at it since the 1960’s, with thirty novels to her credit along with story collections, children’s books and non-fiction titles, all those following a career as an advertising copywriter and work in serial fiction, radio and teleplays. Oh yeah…and she was made a CBE, which makes her a Knight or a Lady (not sure which, but then we did fight a revolution over here so wouldn’t have to worry about those things). Suffice to say she’s been at it a while, knows what she’s talking about, and is generous with anecdotes throughout this book.

Why Will No-One Publish My Novel – A Handbook For The Rejected Writer came out in the UK in 2018, but took a while to pop up on my library’s shelf. (Technically, a nearby library. My library only has half a dozen writer’s books, if that.) I’ll be glad when I get my own copy – this one’s a keeper.

Maybe Next Year…

Maybe Next Christmas

No, The Stiletto Gumshoe won’t be in anyone’s Christmas stocking this year, least of all mine. Perhaps I spent 2019 being naughty when I should’ve been nice. Still, I’m thinking positive thoughts for 2020, and am one of those naive types who truly believe that diligence pays off (even if I’ve been proven wrong in the past). So I know what I hope to find under my tree next year: Not baubles or bangles. Just a book, and one book in particular…

This Is Getting Complicated.

Steven Meisel 2009

John Warner’s “Give A Gift That Supports Small Presses: Skip Amazon And Buy Direct” ran online in the 11.25.19 Chicago Tribune (link below) and reappeared in Sunday’s print/online editions’ Biblioracle feature, putting another spin on the whole ‘where to responsibly buy books’ thing.

For many, the Seattle big boy’s the bad boy, and I get that. For others, it’s their primary link to civilization. Chain booksellers have largely vanished. The noble independent booksellers may not be ‘round the corner, but need our support, and if their inventory doesn’t include the titles we’re looking for, they’ll be happy to order them. (Well, the owners are happy to order them…not so certain about some of the clerks.)

Warner’s Tribune piece notes that Amazon is reducing its publishers’ 2019 holiday season orders as a way to deal with ‘congestion issues’ in its warehouses. In some cases, independent publishers have reported devastating order reductions up to 75%.

We often forget just how much (or how little) publishers – small, micro and indie publishers in particular – make on each individual book sale. That $15.95 trade paperback was probably sold at a 45% to 60%+ trade discount. There may be additional co-op ad/promotional funding deducted from the wholesale price. Plus, the publisher pays the freight to distributors’ designated warehouses (Ingram, for example, has several regional distribution centers). And the publisher will have to accept and provide credit for returns later, when booksellers purge their shelves to make room for new books or simply to convert inventory into much-needed cash. Those returns are rarely (if ever) re-salable, often too shopworn to be remaindered and may only end up pulped for pennies.

So, John Warner’s article prompts book buyers to consider buying direct from indie publishers. More cumbersome than a Seattle-session? Sure it is, and possibly a bit more costly too. But, those publishers will make full price on your orders. Some may even offer online coupons, discounts and incentives of their own. Warner highlights several independent publishers like the University of Chicago Press and Coffee House Press, and points out just how easily and happily lost an avid book buyer can become in their online catalogs.

It’d be nice if buying a book didn’t have to be such a morally weighty endeavor, but it is. We want to support everyone: Authors, publishers and retailers alike. If it sometimes feels like too much to grapple with, I understand and agree. My own approach is to spread my book buying dollars around. With holiday gift buying season here, it should be no surprise that many books are on my shopping list. But after reading John Warner’s Chicago Tribune article, I’m definitely going to some small press and independent publishers’ sites to order direct.

I don’t know if it really helps, but it can’t hurt.

Photo: Dorothea Barth Jorgensen, Madisyn Ritland, Viktoriya Sasonkina and Nimue Smit by Steven Meisel for Alberta Feretti, 2009

https://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/books/ct-books-biblioracle-1201-20191125-arlmpbtvjfd5rayrxelxnnqs34-story.html

Pulp Fictioneers

Pulp Fictioneers John Locke

I suspect that many had-boiled crime fiction fans – readers and writers alike – tend to romanticize the legendary writers from the mid-twentieth century pulp and paperback originals era. I know I do. We have this image of a grizzled wordsmith in a dumpy third floor cold-water walkup, street noise and curbside trash smells wafting through an open window and rattling the yellowed venetian blinds, a second hand desk or wobbly card table with a pint of no-name rye whiskey on one side, a pack of unfiltered Luckies beside an overflowing ashtray on the other, and a temperamental Underwood in the middle, the writer pounding away some first-draft-is-the-only-draft tale of murder and mayhem oozing with just-sexy-enough-to-get-by eroticism, the wrinkled pages headed for Startling Detective or Women In Crime magazine.

And then you think about what that all really would’ve been like, and have to wonder what’s so damn good about the imaginary scenario.

Pulp Fictioneers – Adventures In The Storytelling Business edited by John Locke (Adventure House, 2004) goes a long way to dispelling some of the nostalgic romance. This intriguing read collects over one hundred articles, letters and miscellany from Writer’s Digest, Writer’s magazine and Author & Journalist from the 1920’s through the 50’s which provide a real-life glimpse of the pulp era from both the writers’ and publishers’ perspectives. Low per-word pay rates, production snafu’s, fly-by-night publishing scams, story rejections, puzzling writers’ guidelines, declining newsstand sales and much more – the pieces all make for a compelling read about sides of the marketplace that have nothing to do with The Shadow or Dan Turner Hollywood Detective. One thing’s clear here: Writer’s groused about editors and the markets then as much as they do now, and like all creatives, felt the world was treating them most unfairly. For those of us so entranced by the garish H.J. Ward and Norm Saunders covers and the shoot ‘em up stories, Pulp Fictioneers provides a healthy antidote to romancing bygone eras.

Will Write For Shoes

Red Shoes

Don’t let a site name like “The Stiletto Gumshoe” mislead you. No, I will not write for shoes, and no, I don’t want to write a “Chick Lit” novel. I’m not even certain that anyone uses that term any longer, though the formula remains a general fiction staple, that’s clear enough.

Will Write For Shoes

Will Write For Shoes – How To Write A Chick Lit Novel by Cathy Yardley was a library read grabbed off the shelf on a whim, and a surprisingly entertaining and informative book at that. In particular, I found it illuminating to see how a sub-category can be rigidly ruled by its formulas and templates, while enterprising writers will inevitably circumvent them, which is something on my mind right now as I work through increasingly substantial revisions on my own projects (see my prior post “Tiptoeing ‘Round The Templates”, link below).

Seattle author Cathy Yardley has several steamy looking contemporary romance novels to her credit, along with urban fantasy, traditional romance and, yes: “Chick Lit” novels, plus a couple writing how-to books. This book includes a history of the Chick Lit subcategory, an overview of the formula, writer’s tips and more. Naturally, the FAQ’s, agent and publishers directory lists are outdated, this being a book from 2007. Still, it was an interesting read, even for a noir-ish mystery writer like myself.

https://thestilettogumshoe.com/2019/02/05/tiptoeing-round-the-templates/

You Write.

you write copy

I’ve seen this image darn near everywhere: Tumblr’s, Pinterest boards, random sites and blogs. And I’ve held onto it myself, always liking the message, and doubly so when coupled with the striking photo of a harried looking writer who seems poised to press that very first keyboard key.

I think this may have originated at Jonathan Gunson’s BestsellerLabs site, which may no longer be active, directing you to anther blog/site that seems to be on hold. So I don’t have a clue if Mr. Gunson created this or simply re-posted it from some other source. I’ll risk posting it, though, just because I love it. The message rings true for any endeavor, and it’s a simple but meaningful one for writers.

The secret? You write.

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