Walter Stackpool’s Larry Kents

its hell my lovely larry kent 1960

England had Reginald Heade, Australia had Walter Stackpool.

Australian artist and illustrator Walter Stackpool (1916 – 1999) grew up in Queensland and, armed with a scholarship, set off to study art at the Queensland Art School in 1939. But he never finished the course, signing up for the army instead once WWII broke out. After the war, he quickly found work as a sought-after illustrator for book covers, well known for his many, many westerns done for Cleveland Publishing Company, as well as the Invincible Mysteries series in the early 1950’s, and especially the popular Larry Kent series from the mid-1950’s clear through the 70’s. More about that hard-boiled P.I series soon, which ran about 400 titles!

homicide sweet homicide larry kent 1959

A diverse talent, Stackpool was also a popular children’s book illustrator, and later in his career, a respected wildlife artist. Here are three paintings which I believe are all from the Larry Kent “I Hate Crime” paperback originals series, including “It’s Hell, My Lovely” from 1960 (at the top), “Homicide, Sweet Homicide” from 1959 above, and “The Pushover” from 1963 below.

the pushover larry kent 1963

 

Adriano Rocchi

adriano rocchi 2

I’ve looked, and unless I’m misspelling the artist’s name, I can’t find a thing about Adriano Rocchi. Not just online, mind you. I have several long bookshelves crammed with books on vintage paperbacks, pulp magazines, U.S. and European illustrators and sundry sleaze artists. But…nothing. Now lets guess from the examples I stumbled across that Rocchi is one of the many post-WWII era Italian pulp artists working in Giallo paperbacks, crime/horror/sleaze digests and film posters. If you know more, I’m all ears!

adriano rocchi

I Was A Hideout Honey

Howell Dodd 1951

As is often the case with vintage pulps, it’s not always clear which of the bloodcurdling or teasingly sexy stories the cover art actually depicts. Face it: Sometimes the cover art was commissioned or purchased without any regard for that issue’s individual stories, or before they were even written.

Here, I’m going with “I Was A Hideout Honey” from this 1951 issue of True Cases Of Women In Crime. The classic Howell Dodd gouache illustration (I’ve also seen it credited to George Gross…couldn’t be, though. Right? Experts, please correct me if I’m wrong!) is crammed full of every genre trope and cliché you can ask for: Cigarette dangling from his lips, a bad guy smirks while he fingers his .45. The end table’s littered with an empty glasses, another cigarette smoking away in the ashtray, so you can almost smell that dingy old room. On the divan, the ‘hideout honey’ herself glances his way, resplendent in her filmy negligee, lacy black slip, coyly fussing with her nylons. Who knows what crime’s gone down already or is about to be committed, but Dodd sure nailed it all with this cover art.

True Cases Of Women In Crime 1951

 

Going To Glendale?

2019 Los Angeles Vintage Paperback Show

While I’m about to step out for some quick Saturday AM errands (which might include a bookstore stop…maybe) I’m not planning any two thousand mile treks this weekend. Anyway, there’s an annual vintage pulp, paperback and collectibles show ‘round these parts each Spring, if I was so inclined. I’ve gone to a couple of these shows to see the original cover art and illustration art exhibits, but kept my credit cards safely tucked away in my wallet. Fortunately, (being a fan of retro illustration and postwar crime fiction) I’m rarely gripped by the collector frenzy, which can be as dangerous as a gambling addiction for the weak-willed. But for those of you in the Los Angeles area, the Vintage Paperback Collectors Show & Sale in Glendale this Sunday sure looks like the place to be. And I do like that Robert McGinnis illustration chosen for their poster!

Alain Gourdon: “Aslan”

Une Filles Des Rues Art

I previously posted about the French illustrator Michel Gourdon (Euro-Pulp: Michel Gourdon, 2.1.19) known by some for his pinup art and by others for his numerous euro-sleaze paperback and pulp digest cover illustrations, including Italian Giallo digests.

Michel’s brother was also an artist: Alain Gourdon (1930 – 2014), better known as ‘Aslan’, and like his brother, followed a similar career path, generating numerous euro-pulp, paperback and digest cover illustrations, though better known in Europe and even in the U.S. as a pinup artist.

Une Fille Des RuesAlain Gourdon’s pinup art rep is largely due to his long association with the French men’s magazine Lui (adapted as Oui, in the U.S.) for which he contributed a monthly pinup illustration…particularly explicit illustrations, actually, none of which will be posted here. When American fans of retro-kitsch say ‘pinup’ art, they picture relatively benign (though still a little troubling) postwar era ‘Good Girl Art’ and think of the nod-and-a-wink illustrations from Gil Elvgren, Art Frahm, Alberto Vargas, Zoe Mozert and others. European postwar pinup art, particularly by the 1960’s, was something altogether different. Brown & Bigelow calendars and countless American manufacturers’ posters may have been hung up on military barracks and repair shop walls across the U.S. from the 1930’s through the 60’s. But I can’t imagine where an Aslan pinup could be hung without offending…well, everyone.

That said, Alain Gourdon, who ultimately left France and retired in Canada, had a good run earlier in his career with mystery novels, racy romances and even children’s book series, a few of which are shown here. His style and their overall look was much darker than those from his brother Michael, often as not with stark black backgrounds. THey’re quite different from what was being done at the same time here in the U.S., but in their way, perhaps a bit more noir-ish, you think?

Dossier HathertonEstocade A StockholmMatch NulRazzia Sur Anvers

More Mystery In Moonlight

Mystery In THe Moonlight 1

Here is the full suite of creative retro-pulp homage (or spoof?) images done by model Claudia Schiffer, photographer Michelangelo di Battista, artist Jon Rogers and stylist Alison Edmond for Harper’s Bazaar UK in 2009, titled “Mystery In The Moonlight” and inspired not so much by crime pulps, but more by the so-called ‘shudder pulps’, those dark mystery and horror magazines notorious for their damsels-in-distress (and undress) covers. Also shown below is Ms. Schiffer herself at a gallery opening with the works.

Mystery In The Moonlight 2Mystery In The Moonlight 3Mystery In The Moonlight 5Mystery In The Moonlight 4Mystery In The Moonlight 6Claudia Schiffer - Gallery Photo

Mystery In Moonlight

Claudia Schiffer by Michelangelo di Battista

The image could almost be from a 1950’s B-movie poster, vintage paperback original on a spinning wire rack or a tawdry ‘true crime’ magazine lurking on the bottom row at the candy store. Michelangelo di Battista shoots supermodel Claudia Schiffer for Harper’s Bazaar UK in an editorial titled “Mystery In The Moonlight”, utilizing drawings by artist Jon Rogers, the project styled by Alison Edmond. More of this projects intriguing pulp-spoof images follow in the next post.

Benicio’s Girls With Guns

Jose Luis Benicio 1

It’s a peculiar American conceit: We think we dominate everything. No question, sometimes we do. In the vintage art and illustration arenas for comics, pulp magazines and book covers, titans like McGinnis, Maguire, Steranko, Kirby, Adams and so many others created a remarkable legacy of mid-twentieth century pop-cultural visuals. A person could spend a lifetime studying these artists and their work. But, I also like to snoop around Euro-Sleaze magazines, Giallo digests, and pop illustration in other markets from the UK to Australia and Mexico to South America. There’s a lot to be appreciated.

Centro Commercial

For example, commercial art studios in Spain reached out across Europe — and across the Atlantic as well – to become a powerful force in 1960’s – 70’s comic art art and illustration, most evident in the American market among the many magazine-sized monthlies from Warren Publishing like Creepy, Eerie and Vampirella, along with competing titles from Marvel and Skywald. Meanwhile, the work of talented young artists from Brazil and Venezuela made it into the regular U.S. comic book scene and the paperback cover market, though the latter was contracting so fast at the time, many U.S. artists had already migrated into more lucrative advertising and movie studio work.

Jose Luis Benicio 2

Consider Brazilian artist Jose Luis Benicio, apparently regarded as the ‘King Of The Pinups’ in his own country, though his work actually dealt more with Brazilian film studio posters and regular advertising assignments. Perhaps he really ought to be known as the painter of ‘Girls With Guns’, for his extensive work on period-sexy action/espionage paperback series.

Jose Luis Benicio 3

Born in 1936 near Rio Prado, Benicio originally planned on a career in music, but abandoned the piano for a paint brush, initially starting out as an apprentice in Porto Alegre at only 16, then hitting the big time in Rio de Janeiro in the mid-1950’s. There he worked for various studios and small agencies, eventually forging a lucrative long-term relationship with the Brazilian office of McCann-Erickson advertising by 1961, which led to work for Coca Cola, Esso and others. Tireless in his prime, Benicio also produced, by his own reckoning, over 300 movie posters for the government-backed Embrafilme Studios.

Jose Luis Benicio 5

At the same time, Benicio worked for various publishers on popular Modesty Blaise-style knock-off series like Giselle and Bridgette In Action, nearly all featuring the series’ provocatively posed heroines brandishing a gun. Tame by both U.S. and European standards, these ubiquitous ‘Girl-With-A-Gun’ covers actually brought him some unwelcome attention from the conservative military government. Eventually political changes in Brazil brought an end to the government backed film studio system, and portions of Benicio’s lucrative movie marketing work dried up. He began working with some American publishers, but by this time, digital graphics were already sounding the death knell for traditional illustration.

Jose Luis Benicio 6

Benicio normally worked in gouache, today considered by many to be a dying art. Gouache, which is more or less ‘fine-arts’ tempera paint, combines the brilliance of the purest oils but with unparalleled opacity. Due to its quick drying time, it’s the perfect medium for commercial illustrators. I worked with it a little back in school days, and was impressed with its bright, intense colors and buttery viscosity, but found it pretty tricky to handle. (Which is probably among the many reasons why I’m not a successful commercial illustrator!) More of the well-known vintage U.S. paperback and pulp magazine covers than you’d think were actually done in gouache, not oils.

Jose Luis Benicio 4

To be clear, ‘girls with guns’ aren’t the only thing Benicio painted. But they are among the familiar pop culture images the artist is widely known for, particularly in the South American market. Do dig around a bit on your own if you’d like to see more of the Brazilian illustrator’s work. There are two books on Jose Luis Benicio, though neither is likely to be on a shelf at your local bookstore: Sex & Crime: The Book Cover Art Of Benicio by Reference Press, 2011 and Benicio Created The Woman by Goncalo Junior, originally published in 2006 and re-released in 2012.

Jose Luis Benicio 1stJose Luis Benicio 8Jose Luis Benicio 7

Men In Danger

Howell Dodd Men In Danger magazine 1964

Men in danger? Sure, but I’m not certain which is more dangerous. The easy money for delivering a package of something that’s surely illegal? Or Miss Can’t-Keep-My-Slip-On goading him from her perch on the bed behind? A pulp (or more correctly, one of the so-called ‘mens sweats’) magazine interior illustration by Howell Dodd from a 1964 issue of Men In Danger.

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