Penny-A-Word.

The Penny A Word Brigade

This book may be targeted to writers, but I’m certain any fan of the classic pulp magazine era would love it. Blood ‘N’ Thunder Presents: The Penny-A-Word Brigade – Pulp Fictioneers Discuss Their Craft edited by Ed Hulse is a 2017 200++ page oversize trade pb from Murania Press, the publishers of Blood ‘N’ Thunder. In addition to being the editor-in-chief and publisher of Blood ‘N’ Thunder (and the head-honcho at Murania, I think), Hulse is the author and editor of over 30 books (maybe many more) on vintage pulp magazines, cliffhanger serials and retro Hollywood stars.

Hulse collected 28 articles written by pulp magazine writers, editors and agents that originally appeared in Writer’s Digest, The Writer, Author & Journalist and other magazines between 1922 through 1949. The more things change, the more they stay the same. Pulp writers groused about one and two cents-per-word pay rates then, which writers today might be happy to get instead of payment-in-copies for chapbooks and zines or no-pay at all for online publications. The writers’ and editors’ how-to articles may use obsolete references and point to unknown authors long gone, but the info resonates today as well as it did eighty and ninety years ago.

If you’re a mystery/crime fiction reader (and obviously, if you’re a pulp fiction fan), you’ll get a kick out of this book. And if you’re a mystery/crime fiction writer or wannabe, there’s a lot of mighty useful info here.  And, take a moment to check out Murania Press’ site (link below) for a treasure trove of Blood ‘N’ Thunder back issues, books, collectibles, links and more.

Murania Press

www.muraniapress.com

“…A Silenced Roscoe In Her Trembling Mitt.”

Spicy Detective May 1941 Allen Anderson cover

This May 1941 Spicy Detective is another Adventure House reprint from 2008 (I assume they’re actually POD editions, my copy fresh from Monee, Illinois with a January 2020 date), includes the original pulp magazine’s full issue, ads, Allen Anderson cover art and all. There are stories from Luke Terry, Henri St. Amur, Max Neilson, Walton Grey, Stan Warner and Paul Hama, but the best would surely be Carl Lenox’ “Dressed To Kill” and a must for Spicy Detective, a Dan Turner – Hollywood Detective tale from Robert Leslie Bellem: “Future Book” opening at Hollywood Park Racetrack and dealing with an illegal betting operation, a dead race horse and murder. As always, it’s Bellem’s colorful wordsmithing that makes me enjoy these zany and often implausible yarns so much. Here, Turner follows one dame-in-danger into the track’s stables, only to find another woman there, already dead:

“A caterwauling scream tortured my eardrums like a bandsaw ripping through a hardwood knot. I said: “What the hell –!” and lanced my poundage inside the building. A minute later, I drew up short; felt my solar plexus turning handsprings. Mary Foster was standing there with a silenced roscoe in her trembling mitt. There was a stink of burned cordite in the air and a sprawled feminine form, ominously motionless, on the stable’s concrete floor.

That sprawled form was all that remained of Arlynne Quistan. She was as dead as the skull on a sinus doctor’s desk. Even defunct, the blonde Quistan bimbo was a copious kick in the optics. From the appearance of things, she must have put up a terrific brawl before getting chilled. Her dress was ripped to pennants and you could see practically everything she possessed in the way of she-male blandishments. Her sleekly tapered stems melted into flawless thighs as cream-smooth and tempting as the illustrations in a lingerie ad. Where the bodice of her costume was torn open, the lacy ruins of an uplift brassiere snuggled around curves as perfect as sculpture. It wasn’t until your glance came to her face that you got the horrors. The .38 slug had ripped diagonally northward from chin to temple, finally finding lodging in her think tank.”

too many women henri st. maur

If you’ve never actually read any 1930’s/40’s era crime pulps, Bellem’s way with words pretty much tells you all you need to know about the genre’s incredible, albeit squirm-worthy, writing. Mind you, there’s no shortage of florid, meandering and darn-near un-readable stuff tucked amongst the gems. But if you can compartmentalize all normal 2020 sensibilities long enough, there’s something to be learned from these pulp masters.

Sally The Sleuth

An Adolphe Barreaux Sally The Sleuth four-pager is included. “Crime On Campus” finds Sally going undercover as a college co-ed to trap a campus killer. Barreaux’ Sally The Sleuth stories weren’t really mystery comics so much as abbreviated damsel-in-distress shorties. Panel four from the tale’s opening page says it all: “Why, her undies are on backwards. It’s murder, chief!”  Sally manages to lounge about in her undies with some dorm mates before being snatched by a murderous med school maniac and rescued in the knick of time.

Kinky vintage kitsch at its best…pretty twisted at its worst…but I confess, I’m kind of hooked on these things.

Dangerous Dames

Pulpster copy

The Pulpster No. 26, a 2017 PulpFest publication: Not that I attended PulpFest, only being greedily acquisitive, not really a collector and generally steering clear of cons and swap meets.

But I wanted this particular “Dangerous Dames” issue with Ron Goulart’s survey of early crime and mystery pulps’ female detectives, including Hulbert Footner’s Madame Storey, Cleve F. Adams’ Violet McCade, D.B. McCandless’ Sarah Watson, and of course, Theodore Tinsley’s Carrie Cashin, the most successful of the bunch with nearly 40 stories appearing in Crime Busters and Street & Smith’s Mystery Magazine between 1937 and 1942. Prolific author and pop culture historian Ron Goulart was the perfect choice for this piece with his mile-long fiction resume and a dozen or more non-fiction books including The Hard-Boiled Dicks: An Anthology And Study Of Pulp Detective Fiction (1967) and The Dime Detectives (I have a 1980’s edition of that book). You may know him from a roster of pen names including Howard Lee, Jillian Kearny and several others. Goulart’s piece was followed by Bill Pronzini’s “Women In The Detective Pulps”, a look at women crime fiction writers working in the pulp magazines’ boyz club, including Marjorie Stoneman Douglas, Carolyn Wells, Dorothy Dunn and others.

Black Mask July 1949

The Pulpster wasn’t a newsstand magazine, to my knowledge, and at only 40 pages, a bit pricey, but well worth it for those two articles. Well, those, and the nifty Norman Saunders cover illustration, which was from the July 1949 issue of Black Mask, and still available as a poster at the artist’s website (normansaunders.com). BTW, that bloody hand print really is the artist’s own hand covered with red paint, according to Saunders’ son.

The Skeleton In Santa Claus’s Closet.

Snappy Stories

I not entirely sure I want to know what skeletons Santa’s got hiding in his closet. His personal stash of pilfered toys from the workshop? Incriminating photos of Mrs. Claus? The down ‘n dirty scoop on Rudolph? Or is it really where the naughtier elves rendezvous in secret? We’ll never know, unless you can get your mitts on this 1926 issue of Snappy Stories.

 

No Christmas Cozies Here.

Hard boiled christmas stories

I’ll skip Dickens’ A Christmas Carol again this year and just do a re-read (or at least a thorough re-browse) of Reverse Karma Press’ 146-page trade pb Hard-Boiled Christmas Stories, collecting multiple holiday-themed stories from the 1930’s – 1940’s pulp magazine heyday.

The anthology includes crooked Santa Clauses (spell-check, please), holiday homicides and seasonal scams from John K. Butler (writer of the hard-boiled L.A. cabbie Steve Midnight tales), Steve Fisher (1941’s I Wake Up Screaming), Henry Leverage (editor of Sing Sing prison’s in-house publication, where he was a ‘resident’), West Pointer Lt. John Hopper, newspaperman Jack Kofoed, and several others. The book leads off with a Dan Turner – Hollywood Detective yarn, but not by Turner’s creator Robert Leslie Bellem, this homage tale penned instead by the anthology’s editor John Wooley, who also edited the first-ever Dan Turner collection. I’ve talked about my love affair with Robert Leslie Bellem’s sing-songy slang-filled snappy banter before, and Wooley does the artful word-smith’s style justice here in “Santa’s Slay Ride”. Why no Bellem original? Though he knocked out literally hundreds of Dan Turner short stories and comics scripts, the Hard-Boiled Christmas Stories editors concluded that Bellem had never written a Christmas story for the hard-boiled Hollywood private eye. Go figure.

I don’t know why Santa Claus and his elves would want to leave a 1930’s pulp cover style damsel-in-distress all ‘wrapped up’ under the Christmas tree, but that cover art was done by David Saunders, son of the late pulp, paperback and pinup illustrator Norm Saunders, intended to emulate the familiar style of mystery and crime pulp maestro H.J. Ward.

 

 

Carrie Cashin

Crime Busters July 1939 - Carrie Cashin

I read my first Carrie Cashin story in Bernard Drew’s excellent Hard-Boiled Dames anthology, but finding more is a challenge, unless you’re ready to fork over significant dollars for collectible pulps (which I’m not). I only recently spotted two Carrie Cashin tales (“Black Queen” and her debut, “White Elephant”) in The Shadow #133 and #138 at Bud Plant’s budsartbooks.com. They’ve been added to my Christmas list, though I suppose I’ll end up ordering them myself after the holidays (no one ever wants to stuff my Christmas stocking with the real fun stuff).

Carrie Cashin 1

Created by Theodore Tinsely, Carrie Cashin appeared in over forty stories in Street & Smith’s Crime Busters and Mystery pulp magazines between 1937 and 1942.  A former department store detective, Carrie looks “like a demure brown-eyed stenographer in a tailored jacket and tweed skirt”, and often defers to her “broad-shouldered assistant Aleck, to allay any clients’ concerns about a woman detecting” when they’re with clients. But Miss Cashin is the real head of the Cash & Carry Detective Agency, the first to leap into danger, and clearly the brains of the outfit. Like Lars Anderson’s Domino Lady, Carrie has a derringer strapped to her thigh beneath her skirt, sometimes surprises with a bigger weapon hidden in her purse, and rarely balks when the bad guys are up for some fisticuffs.  The Hard-Boiled Dames anthology included Tinsley’s “The Riddle In Silk”, in which Carrie (with assistant Aleck in tow) investigates a bloody murder in a remote mansion on the requisite dark and stormy night, which leads them back into the city and ultimately to the waterfront docks on the trail of a stolen pair of silk stockings which “may mean the difference between peace and war in Europe”, the hose containing secret coded messages.

I’ll have to keep looking for an affordable pulp reprint or anthology I’ve overlooked to locate Carrie Cashin in “The Man With The Green Whiskers” novelette from the July 1939 Crime Busters magazine depicted above at the top. Looks like the bad guys got the drop on Carrie this time, and maybe her lilac frock and slip contain something they want bad enough to hold her at gunpoint. Fear not: Carrie will get out this predicament.

Carrie Cashin

 

The Lady Is A Witch.

Startling Stories Earle K. Bergey

It’s almost Halloween, so let’s get witchy with an impractically attired sorceress perched on her flying broom for Norman Daniels’ “The Lady Is A Witch” from the March 1950 Startling Stories pulp magazine.

The cover illustration’s by Pennsylvania artist Earle K. Bergey (1901 – 1952), who’s better known for fetching female space adventurers who — like our witch here — tended to be on the scantily clad side. I’ve read that his many sex-i-fied sci-fi sirens, who often sported inventive metal breastplates of one sort or another, were the inspiration for Princess Leia’s ‘slave girl’ costume from Return Of The Jedi. True or just online myth, who knows?

Norman Daniels’ complete novel appeared in this nearly 70 year-old pulp with interior illustrations by famed fantasy pulp artist Virgil Finlay.

 

Black Garters of Death

startling detective feb 1949 copy

Anyone thinking things were safer back in the ‘good ol’ days’ oughta think twice. Evidently a fellow couldn’t even go to the picture show back in 1949 without running into a movie-mad blonde wearing black garters of death. So, just keep walkin’, dude…

Still More From Manhunt

Manhunt Dec 1958

Manhunt magazine (1952 – 1967) not only published many of mystery/crime fiction’s best writers, it offered covers that rivaled the best of the era’s competing mystery and private eye series paperbacks, promising chills and sexy thrills the same way the 1930’s – 40’s era crime pulps did, but in a less cartoonish and much more sophisticated style. Check out the preceding posts for more on Manhunt, and I promise I’ll move on to other topics now.

manhunt dec 1953manhunt juy 1956 walter popp covermanhunt m spillane 1953Manhunt Nov

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