Crewe’s Film Noir Series

David J Crewe 3

Canadian photographer David J. Crewe, currently residing in Chicago, made the leap into photography from business, also serving in officer roles in the ASMP and Professional Photographers of America. Apparently this “Film Noir Series” was cooked up by Crewe and some friends while in San Diego for a charity event, tapping some pals to serve as models (one of whom worked for a suit company and could help with wardrobe), the entire project completed in just 48 hours.

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Escaping Camp Santa

Escaping Camp Santa Emil Landgreen

I’m sure I posted this lasted year, but nifty art is worth repeating. “Escaping Camp Santa”, a pulp-flavored Noir-Noel promotional piece from talented illustrator, designer and concept artist Emil Landgreen.

You Have Killed Me.

You Have Killed Me Cover

Cold and windy under nonstop pouring rain, last Saturday would’ve been a good day to stay indoors. But I ventured out to pick up a current events book reserved at the library (there being a current event or two to keep tabs on these days). The local public library’s a bit lean on actual books, but is well appointed with comfy reading nooks, plush seating and even a fireplace. Almost ready to check out, Jamie S. Rich and Joelle Jones’ You Have Killed Me caught my eye on the graphic novel section’s endcap. I have it, of course, being an ardent Jones fan. Still, I paused to flip through the 2018 trade pb edition of this 2009 graphic novel anyway. Before I knew it, I’d dropped into one of those fireside chairs to reread this yummy bit of retro noir fun from cover to cover before dashing back out into the rain.

You Have Killed Me Art

Some will holler cliché. Me? I see nothing but classic noir and hard-boiled genre tropes lovingly celebrated in Rich’s story, a smooth flowing piece of work that reads like a period-perfect screenplay for a 1940’s-50’s noir. As for Joelle Jones art? Fans might be surprised to see some softer lines and curvier faces here and there, but it’s still Joelle Jones’ brilliant, stylized draftsmanship throughout, and an excellent chance to see where she was ten years ago. The pair make an excellent team (as seen since on Lady Killer, for example) in this tale of hard luck P.I. Antonio Mercer, hired by wealthy and beautiful Jessica Roman to locate her sister Julie, who’s gone missing on the eve of her society wedding…the missing Julie also Mercer’s one-time lover. But family dramas and messy love affairs are the least of Mercer’s problems once he begins to tangle with gamblers, gangsters and hard-assed cops in jazz clubs, racetracks and roadhouses. Any savvy noir fan will smell a rat – or at least an untrustworthy femme fatale – early on, but even the savviest may not be ready for what really happened to the missing sister. Trust me: This one’s a treat.

Sure, I got soaked on my way back to my car. But I did get the political rant hardcover I’d reserved a week earlier (just to drive myself nuts) and had a good time savoring Jamie Rich’s wordsmithing and ogling Joelle Jones art, both every bit as tasty today as ten years ago when the book came out.

 

Crime Does Not Pay: The First issues

Crime Does Not Pay Volume 1

A while back I mentioned Blackjacked And Pistol-Whipped: A Crime Does Not Pay Primer,  a handsome 2011 Dark Horse Books trade pb with a sampling of stories from that notorious early 1950’s pre-comics code authority era title, which also included a detailed, multi-page history by Denis Kitchen.

Crime Does Not Pay: Volume One is a 2012 hardcover reproducing complete intact issues, ads and all. Much of Crime Does Not Pay’s legendary status – and why it attracted the attention of censors and the newly appointed Comics Code Authority — is due to its gruesome covers more than the actual stories and art, some of which can be surprisingly tame. But oh, those covers…yikes! The Charles Biro art shown here is pretty indicative of some. Crime Does Not Pay was packaged by Charles Brio and Bob Wood, the latter coming to a nasty end a few years after Crime Does Not Pay’s demise, doing time for manslaughter (which by all accounts should have been a second-degree murder charge), his girlfriend the victim. Out after only three years, Wood hit the skids, and died in 1961…run over by a truck when drunk, or as the rumor mill tells it, taken for a one-way ride by some former prison acquaintances. Either way, Wood’s story is a Crime Does Not Pay tale in itself, and worthy of its own post later.

This 279-page book is a visual treat, with crisp and vibrant colors throughout that really make the sometimes-stilted vintage artwork pop. Volumes Two and Three were right beside this book when I bought it a week ago. I have a feeling they’ll be going home with me on my next trip to that particular comix shop.

Pistols And Peter Pan Collars.

New Era Shirt Co

From My Vintage Vogue (via Dirty River):

I can’t resist retro girlz with gunz, even if they’re in a print ad for particularly un-intimidating Peter Pan blouses. But hey, they’re “Sanforized” (of course) which I’m guessing might be some phony wrinkle free nonsense. As for “carrot-crisp” combed cotton? I can’t even guess, and someone should’ve had a sit-down with that copywriter.

Well, nonetheless: Stick ’em up, ladies…

Spade & Archer

Chris Knight Photography

Look hard, I do believe it reads “Spade & Archer” on that frosted glass door. The photo’s by Chris Knight, born in Germany and (I think) currently living and working Florida, best known for his opulently staged portraits, cinematic styled editorial work and as the author of The Dramatic Portrait. Look for more of his work at chrisknightphoto.com.

“Caught”

Caught Suzy Parker 1962 by Melvin Sokolsky

Spotted at the tres cool “Real Bronx Betty” Tumblr blog, originally posted at Olga-4711’s Tumblr: “Caught”, with the original 1950’s-60’s ‘supermodel’, Suzy Parker, photographed by Melvin Sokolsky in 1962. And it looks like this snoopy ‘stiletto gumshoe’ definitely has been. Caught, that is.

What’s Beyond The Edges.

Brian Tull 2

Born in 1975, Brian Tull’s only way to remember the 1930’s through 1950’s is through his imagination. Which must be vivid, and which he draws upon to create his enormous photo-realistic paintings and public art murals, each “strategically cropped…sometimes confrontational and often featuring the female figure as protagonist, giving you a subtle glimpse into the characters’ lives. Usually leaving you wondering what or who is beyond the edges.” Retro? Yes, and wonderfully so, but there’s more at work here than mere nostalgia. Check out more of the artist’s work at his site (if only to get a better feel for the size of the paintings): briantull.com.

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