Girl With A Gun

armand seguso

The illustration is just called ‘Girl With Gun’, which kind of says it all.

It’s by Armand Seguso (1897 – 1984), Italian born, but grew up in the U.S. and used a talent for music to fund his art education in New York, playing violin in cabarets and movie pit orchestras. Seguso is actually best known as an MGM studio artist, responsible for some of the original and iconic Gone With The Wind poster illustrations. In fact, when Seguso’s grandson Rick Seguso, also an artist, heard that a soon-to-open “Scarlett O’Hara” Chicago restaurant was looking or an artist to paint murals based on the book and classic film, he campaigned for the job and painted three 7’ x 8’ murals, recreating his grandfather’s works. Gone With The Wind murals, that is…not girls with guns.

And, More Manhunt.

Manhunt 6

See the preceding post…

As mentioned in the prior post, I’m eagerly waiting for (and have already pre-ordered) The Best of Manhunt – A Collection Of The Best Of Manhunt Magazine, a forthcoming book due out this summer. But till then, enjoy a few more cover scene shots culled from here and there, and dig the list of authors the magazine showcased. Impressive!

Manhunt 7Manhunt 8Manhunt 5 April 1953

 

 

Men In Danger

Howell Dodd Men In Danger magazine 1964

Men in danger? Sure, but I’m not certain which is more dangerous. The easy money for delivering a package of something that’s surely illegal? Or Miss Can’t-Keep-My-Slip-On goading him from her perch on the bed behind? A pulp (or more correctly, one of the so-called ‘mens sweats’) magazine interior illustration by Howell Dodd from a 1964 issue of Men In Danger.

Basil Gogos

Basil Gogos

The name Basil Gogos (1929 – 2017) is inextricably linked to Forrest J. Ackerman’s beloved monster kidz magazine Famous Monsters Of Filmland, Gogos responsible for so many of the cover illustrations of classic monster characters, all done in his own striking color schemes. But like most postwar illustrators, Basil Gogos did all kinds of work, from prosaic advertising assignments to paperback book covers, pulp magazine covers, interior illustrations even work for the so-called “Mens’ Sweats” magazines.

Edmond Gray

Edmond Gray

Maybe I’m just looking in all the wrong places. I don’t think I’m misspelling the artist’s name. But I can’t seem to locate much (or any!) background or biographical information about postwar illustrator Edmond Gray. I’ll keep digging, but till I do uncover something, here’s a piece that’s always been among my favorites from that era.

And, More About Mavis…

The Bump & GRind Murders 1964 originally

And more About Carter Brown’s Female Private Detective, Mavis Seidlitz (see the preceding posts):

The early Mavis Seidlitz novels were published with pretty typical paperback original crime fiction style cover art. I don’t think any single artist handled the series, but I’ll leave that to the collectors and experts to clarify. In the 1960’s, the books were ‘branded’ with consistent designs featuring provocative glamor girl paintings by master illustrator Robert McGinnis. No doubt, the fetching cover art had a lot to do with the series sales, even if they had little to do with the novels’ plots, often as not. McGinnis actually did just shy of 100 Carter Brown books. By the 1970’s, original cover art paintings remained popular in romance, western, science fiction and sword & sorcery/fantasy genres, but had largely fallen out of favor for general fiction and the mystery genre. Carter Brown titles, including the Mavis Seidlitz series, were reissued then in photo covers.

More in the next post…

none but the lethal heart (1959 originally)

the loving and the dead (1959 originally)

Tomorrow Is Murder 1960 originally

 

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