Just Let Them Do The Talking.

If you’re an Elmore Leonard (10.11.25 – 8.20.2013) fan, which I am, you’ll want to visit Crime Reads for Dwyer Murphy’s excellent piece “How Elmore Leonard Really Wrote His Novels – According To His Characters” (link below).  Leonard was one of those incredibly prolific writers who built a loyal fan base of avid readers right alongside equally dedicated followers among writers who marveled at his streamlined and readable storytelling that always stripped away the superfluous. Everything superfluous. And did so with what seemed like effortless ease (which I’m certain it wasn’t). As Dwyer Murphy explains, Leonard named his characters and more or less told them to start talking, and that’s how the story unfolded. And it worked, by God, it really really worked.

Dwyer’s article is an interesting read in itself, and timely on Leonard’s birthday, but all the more so for the excellent links to previous Crime Reads articles on Elmore Leonard. Writer or reader, you’ll find them all worth a read, and below you’ll also find a link to a year-old post from right here about Leonard’s famous “rules for writers”.

https://thestilettogumshoe.com/2019/10/14/the-rules/

Will Write For Shoes

Red Shoes

Don’t let a site name like “The Stiletto Gumshoe” mislead you. No, I will not write for shoes, and no, I don’t want to write a “Chick Lit” novel. I’m not even certain that anyone uses that term any longer, though the formula remains a general fiction staple, that’s clear enough.

Will Write For Shoes

Will Write For Shoes – How To Write A Chick Lit Novel by Cathy Yardley was a library read grabbed off the shelf on a whim, and a surprisingly entertaining and informative book at that. In particular, I found it illuminating to see how a sub-category can be rigidly ruled by its formulas and templates, while enterprising writers will inevitably circumvent them, which is something on my mind right now as I work through increasingly substantial revisions on my own projects (see my prior post “Tiptoeing ‘Round The Templates”, link below).

Seattle author Cathy Yardley has several steamy looking contemporary romance novels to her credit, along with urban fantasy, traditional romance and, yes: “Chick Lit” novels, plus a couple writing how-to books. This book includes a history of the Chick Lit subcategory, an overview of the formula, writer’s tips and more. Naturally, the FAQ’s, agent and publishers directory lists are outdated, this being a book from 2007. Still, it was an interesting read, even for a noir-ish mystery writer like myself.

https://thestilettogumshoe.com/2019/02/05/tiptoeing-round-the-templates/

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